1911 slide to frame fit?

Discussion in 'Handguns' started by bjl95mustang, Mar 8, 2009.

  1. bjl95mustang

    bjl95mustang Member

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    This is my first 1911 and i'm not sure if the slide to frame fit is too loose or not. Is there anyone in the austin area that can look at it to see how she looks before I send it to Springfield?

    Thanks,
    Brandon
     


  2. SIG_Fiend

    SIG_Fiend Administrator TGT Supporter Admin

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    Is the gun new? Honestly, slide to frame fit is one of those things I think people hype up a bit too much. Yeah, maybe it's a bigger deal for something being used for bullseye matches, but for the average handgun use personally I think it's not a big deal at all. My P220 has a fairly sloppy slide to frame fit (it's used of course and '94 manufacture), and the thing is still accurate as hell.
     
  3. bjl95mustang

    bjl95mustang Member

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    It's a 1997 model.
     
  4. Texas1911

    Texas1911 TGT Addict

    May 29, 2017
    Austin, TX
    I'm sure it has some slop, but it's not going to make the gun inaccurate. There are more important things in a 1911 that create it's accuracy.
     
  5. JKTex

    JKTex Well-Known

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    Can you describe what "loose" is to you?

    Most current production 1911's, like Kimber, are very tight. Most buyer use them to shoot paper and carry and not go to battle every day. Tight should equate to more accurate which these same buyers equate to "better" guns as they can shoot an innocent piece of paper in nice tight groups. They loosen up with shooting.

    Old Colt's used in the war were rattle traps because they "were" battle guns. They needed to be able to shoot after being dropped in the mud, dirt, dipped in fresh and salt water, rain etc. and not detail stripped and lubed with fancy oils after every 50 rounds. They might get lucky to get some old motor oil dumped on them every now and then. Accurate was if they could hit a target within pistol range well enough to deliver permanent wound cavities that would get the shooter one step closer to going home on their own 2 feet.

    That gun today would more often get called a POS because a 1-2" group in paper at 3 - 7- 15 yards might not happen, even on a bench. 4-6" groups would be a good shoot.

    Is the gun, not the shooter, accurate to your liking? If so, you probably don't have any problem. If you're match shooting you might want a tighter fit and accuracy enhanced. Just keep it clean, lubed and don't go swimming in mud holes after bad guys. :happy0001:

    Otherwise, drop by a smith and let them look at it. Of course they'll be able to make it tighter, but do you really need it?

    Happy shooting. Hopefully shooting paper is all you'll need! :texas:
     
  6. claymore504

    claymore504 Well-Known

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    I here all these people that want almost zero tolerance slide to frame finish out of a 1911. I read an article once and the author said perfect fit 1911s will just bring malfunctions. A little play will be more reliable. A 1911 is not a sniper rifle.
     
  7. 45tex

    45tex Well-Known

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    I waited for more knowledgeable folks to answer first. In 1991 or so, I met a guy named Dixon. He was a national or world champion 1911 shooter, and a smith. He let me hold his championship 1911. It rattled like a tank. He said that's how they were intended to be so you could rely on them. This thing had a scope mounted too.
    Just for grins he polished some parts of my S&W 4506 and smoothed a couple of edges that would become bothersome after shooting a lot. He shook my gun, it rattled a bit, and he said "that's a good sound for a carry gun." Its just one more reason my 4506 is special to me.
     
  8. Texas1911

    Texas1911 TGT Addict

    May 29, 2017
    Austin, TX
    A 1911 built for accuracy will be tight, but it will still glide smoothly. The Kimber syndrome is what gave alot of this "tight don't run" mentality. Kimbers are built to break-in and are sometimes so tight that the gun barely runs at all. They are accurate guns, but they are built overly tight in my opinion. Rarely do you get one that is smooth like what you find in a higher end 1911, which is understandable given the cost difference.

    What you want in a 1911 is solid lug lock-up, a good barrel, and a good barrel bushing. The rest is a small percentage, but to some, it's worth the money.
     
  9. bjl95mustang

    bjl95mustang Member

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    I took it to Hank Fleming Gunsmith yesterday. They said it's fine and that stainless models need more play then the regular steel models.
     
  10. JKTex

    JKTex Well-Known

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    I agree it sounds like it's fine, but did he elaborate on why SS needs more play than "regular" (carbon steel). :gotme:
     

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