52 Years ago today

thescoutranch

TN Transplant - Loving it here in TX
Mar 5, 2020
560
93
Georgetown
This is a thank you to all the military who have served throughout the years.

52 years ago today my father was serving in the Air Force (20th SOS), and was shot down in Cambodia piloting a UH1 helicopter, while extracting special operations forces. Everyone on board survive the crash and spent the next eight hours on the ground defending their position against overwhelming enemy odds. My father took command of the troops on the ground and was directing the fire suppression runs by the two gun ships in his flight. Once the gun ships were low on fuel/ammo they would cycle back to the base and another pair would be dispatched.

My father only told me the entire story once. He told me his only prayer to God was, “ if something happens to me, take care of my family“. It took over eight hours to coordinate the extraction for the group. For his actions that day he was awarded the Air Force cross.

I have always counting my blessings for getting to have my father back in my life. So many children do not get their parents back, because they served their country, I was very blessed and fortunate.
Over the last couple of years, he has continually slipped into the grip of the disease of Alzheimer’s, and doesn’t remember a lot of the events in his life.

Thank you God, for protecting and returning my father to me, 52 years ago, today
 

mad88minute

Well-Known
Oct 13, 2017
1,018
113
Houston
Your story gave me chills and foggy vision. I'm still relatively young, but I still thank every youngster I see in uniform for stepping up to serve so I don't have to continue in my service.

I came home from the army just in time to watch my grandfather loose the last bit of his memory to alzheimer's. After that he went back to his army days and wanted to fight everyone when he saw me. He knew I was a soldier, remembered he was a soldier and went to work. One of the last things he told me was " get your gun, let's go!" Later that day he put a male nurse thru some drywall.

Sent from my moto e6 using Tapatalk
 

satx78247

TGT Addict
Jun 23, 2014
8,258
113
78208
Your story gave me chills and foggy vision. I'm still relatively young, but I still thank every youngster I see in uniform for stepping up to serve so I don't have to continue in my service.

I came home from the army just in time to watch my grandfather loose the last bit of his memory to alzheimer's. After that he went back to his army days and wanted to fight everyone when he saw me. He knew I was a soldier, remembered he was a soldier and went to work. One of the last things he told me was " get your gun, let's go!" Later that day he put a male nurse thru some drywall.

Sent from my moto e6 using Tapatalk

mad88minute,

I SALUTE your grandfather's HONORABLE SERVICE

For the last year of her LONG life, Mother believed that it was early 1942, that she was a newlywed & that I was my Dad & that "Honey, you look very handsome in your Army Air Corps uniform."
(Mother passed away peacefully in her sleep at 99 years, 8 months of age in SEP 2017.)

yours, satx
USA, Retired
 
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MTA89

CEO of White Privilege Inc.
TGT Supporter
Mar 10, 2017
5,363
113
Texoma
Vietnam vets have my eternal gratitude. I am absolutely disgusted by the way they were treated by the filthy flag burning communist pussies who stayed at home

Your father is a warrior. Men like him are the reason why the revolution was won and why we enjoy our lives in America today. Seriously, if anyone who reads this is a Vietnam vet, thank you sincerely for what you did for us. Alot of us young bloods are absolutely grateful for your sacrifice
 

pronstar

TGT Addict
TGT Supporter
Jul 2, 2017
6,538
113
Dallas
My dad met my mom in Saigon, he was a spook. Worked for a “an American telecommunications company” and my mom did as well.

They left in ‘68, they saw the writing on the wall. It wasn’t safe for them to be there.

Commies murdered much of the family on my moms side, my mom was considered a traitor.

We, as well as some other relatives who became Americans through the refugee process, sponsored a great many “boat people” who fled. Some blood relatives, others not.

Some of the stories they shared with us would make any one of you men weep.
They knew oppression.
They risked their lives to come to America. To become Americans.

None took a dime of welfare or any other government assistance...they were too proud, and knew the land of opportunity would provide for them.

I was born in CA in ‘71.

As an American, I’m ashamed of how we treated these men, and what we’ve become as a nation.

To say that I’m eternally grateful for the strong men who fought for the freedom of my mother’s homeland is an understatement - I would not be here today if it weren’t for brave men like your father, and mine.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

Axxe55

Just a man, and his dogs.
Dec 15, 2019
16,969
113
In the Deep East Texas Pineywoods!
My father served in the Air Force during the Vietnam War, but was stateside the entire time working on B52 bombers going to Vietnam. He was also serving and servicing B52 bombers during the Cuban Missile Crisis.

My Uncle "Bill" joined and served in the Navy, and was deployed in the "Brown Water Navy" in Vietnam. Uncle "Bill" ended up retiring from the Navy after 22 years of service.

Funny story about Uncle Bill. I can remember as a wee youngster him having tattoos, and swore one day I'd have a tattoo. So in a way, he was part of the reason I ended up with several tattoos! My father was sort of against having tattoos, and back in about 2008 or 2009 when I had my first heart attack, my father visited me in the hospital, and it was the first time he ever saw my tattoos, and blamed Uncle Bill for me having them!
 
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