Anyone know anything about Electrician Apprenticeships?

Axxe55

MIA-BOLO.
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Dec 15, 2019
22,823
113
Texas
Another consideration. Even if you went the route of going to a trade school to learn a career, most are typically two years or less to gain the basic skills to perform that job skill. Student debt for a trade school is much less than the typical college or university, which means a person will end up earning more money faster while having their student debt paid off much faster than some college trained idiot with his degree in something he can't even get a decent paying job with.
 

Gummi Bear

Active Member
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Mar 24, 2015
275
43
Arlington
OP -

You do not have to join the union to attend an apprenticeship school.

I went through open shop apprenticeship, and now have been teaching there for several years (2nd year)

I got my journeyman license at 24, and passed my masters test when I was 29

I’m happy to discuss it with you


The reality is, that the union is indeed present here in Texas, but not nearly as powerful or influential as they are in other parts of the country. There’s a handful of contractors here in DFW, they’re a bit more prominent down around Houston and the ports. Once you break down the real costs, you’ll make a comparable living working for an open shop, without the politics and other shenanigans.



I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately...

Henry David Thoreau
 

smittyb

Well-Known
Rating - 100%
9   0   0
Nov 12, 2009
2,175
113
Cut N Shoot
Here's my 2 cents. If you want to be a residential/commercial electrician, stay merit based (non-union), unless you are moving to Houston or SA.
If you want to go transmission or distribution, join the IBEW. I dislike unions' political shenanigans, but it just might save your life.
 

stuhoevel

New Member
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Dec 2, 2020
8
3
San Antonio
I'm not in the trades but I have to keep up with pay scales. The one thing I have heard is they like federally funded jobs because those jobs have to use the Davis Bacon Wage Act prevailing wage and it is higher than the open shops, at least here in San Antonio.

There is alot of good information and advice in this thread. Not just for the apprenticeship program but in general, show up, be attentive, work hard, etc.

I'm going to throw out a different option. Learn what you can in the trades, how to read the plans, what it takes to buld and install those systems. Then in 5 to 10 years look into cost estimating. Three of my best hires have been from the plumbing, hvac and electrical trades. Two of them are still with me and they teach me something new every week.
 

mongoose

Active Member
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Sep 10, 2012
595
63
nm
I'm not in the trades but I have to keep up with pay scales. The one thing I have heard is they like federally funded jobs because those jobs have to use the Davis Bacon Wage Act prevailing wage and it is higher than the open shops, at least here in San Antonio.

There is alot of good information and advice in this thread. Not just for the apprenticeship program but in general, show up, be attentive, work hard, etc.

I'm going to throw out a different option. Learn what you can in the trades, how to read the plans, what it takes to buld and install those systems. Then in 5 to 10 years look into cost estimating. Three of my best hires have been from the plumbing, hvac and electrical trades. Two of them are still with me and they teach me something new every week.
Open or Closed shops are required to both use the Davis Bacon rates on a job specifying the scale. I’ve bid various projects which specified the DB rates be used, not just Federal jobs.
 

Axxe55

MIA-BOLO.
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Dec 15, 2019
22,823
113
Texas
This is just an observation from my own personal perspective in the trades industry as a mechanic

There really isn't an "apprenticeship" in mechanics and repairing vehicles, trucks, heavy equipment, marine or farm equipment. Sometimes a shop will hire a helper to do shop cleaning, running parts, and grunt work that no one else wants to do. Occasionally, one of the older more experienced mechanics will mentor a helper if he shows potential to wanting to learn, and has a good work ethic and attitude.

In many of the shops I managed over the years, I looked more at the person's attitude and work ethic and having an ability for mechanical aptitude than if they were the best whiz-bang mechanic to walk in looking to hire on.

I could teach that person to be a good mechanic. You can't teach someone work ethic or having a positive "can-do" attitude. Those should have been learned when they were growing up IMO.

In any of the trades, you have to be willing to do the dirty grunt work that others put off on you. Think of it as test to to see if your are worthy in their eyes of taking the time to teach you the trade.

It's a dirty job, but someone has to do it!

When I started learning how to mechanic, I started off in my uncle's repair shop. I was treated no worse, and no better than anyone else working for my uncle. And just because he owned the shop, didn't grant me any special favors by a long-shot.

But some things I learned from my uncle and the guys that worked for him. Earn your keep. Volunteer to do the dirty jobs. Learn other people's jobs as well. Be the first to work, ready to go to work, and be the last to leave. When you complete a task, go find the supervisor or manager and ask what needs to be done next. Learn to be initiative and looking around to see for yourself what needs to be done. Don't be afraid to ask for help if you don't understand something.
 

Daley_G

Member
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Mar 17, 2021
54
33
Cypress
^^^ THIS.

You can't train give-a-snot or work ethic. Last kid I hired was a SPONGE and would soak up anything I was willing to teach him. Like @Axxe55 said: first to show up, last to leave, and always look for something to do - especially if it's something that will make life easier for those above you. Conversely, spend your time on your cell phone with your girlfriend and you'll be the first out the door.

A few old sayings that have brought me my success in life:

  • You're either on your way up or you're on your way out
  • Do what you said you'd do, before you said you'd do it
  • Always deliver more than expected
  • The job is going to get done - you get to decide if it's done by you or your replacement
 

Axxe55

MIA-BOLO.
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Dec 15, 2019
22,823
113
Texas
^^^ THIS.

You can't train give-a-snot or work ethic. Last kid I hired was a SPONGE and would soak up anything I was willing to teach him. Like @Axxe55 said: first to show up, last to leave, and always look for something to do - especially if it's something that will make life easier for those above you. Conversely, spend your time on your cell phone with your girlfriend and you'll be the first out the door.

A few old sayings that have brought me my success in life:

  • You're either on your way up or you're on your way out
  • Do what you said you'd do, before you said you'd do it
  • Always deliver more than expected
  • The job is going to get done - you get to decide if it's done by you or your replacement

Excellent post!
 

gdr_11

Well-Known
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Aug 1, 2014
1,940
113
I managed all of the trades, and each had its own requirements that made some guys excel while others would fail. Work ethics aside (which as mentioned is 90% of everything) you need to determine if your strengths lie in being creative, persistent, problem solving, math, visualization (reading schematics and routing piping/wiring, etc.) Some guys can look at a maze of obstructions then grab a pipe bender and go to work on conduit without ever looking up, achieving a perfect fit. Others will measure, bend, remeasure, bend and end up throwing away a half dozen conduits before they are done. Not everyone is cut out for every job no matter how well they learn the basics.

From personal experience, do not go into electrical work if you are not 100% committed to safety and learning how to stay healthy from the old guys who have done this for years. I have unfortunately seen experience electricians killed, maimed and crippled for life because they forgot a basic safety protocol one time in 20 years. Especially if you are working on high voltage, it is no joke. Distribution and substation work is only for a select few who want to live a long life.
 

Products discussed on TGT


Support

Sponsors

Greeneye Tactical
silencers
third coast
DK Firearms
Tyrant Designs
Ranier
Every Day Man
Shroud

Latest posts

Forum statistics

Threads
100,913
Messages
2,316,858
Members
31,768
Latest member
Devinthedude
Top Bottom