Bugout bag Vs Evac Bag

radioflyer

Active Member
Mar 21, 2009
416
18
Classifying the two as different.

Evacuation: A localized act of nature or man-made disaster which requires the organized temporary (unlikely permanent) re-location of your home's inhabitants to a temporary relatively nearby location (home of friends/family or lodging)

Bugout: Collapse of society on a significant level requiring the permanent re-location of your home's inhabitants to a secure location to ensure safety from an anarchic population for an indefinite period of time.

Preparing a bag (that you could carry hands free) for each? what would you put in them?
 

shortround

TGT Addict
Jan 24, 2011
6,635
36
Grid 0409
If you bug out what will you leave behind? Family heirlooms, important documents (birth certificates, bank statements, medical records, etc.).

Thinking of just yourself, or do family and neighbors come to mind?

Unless you are in a flood plain or next to a nuclear power plant that is melting down, it is best to stay put.

If society collapses, millions of others will try to do what you wish to do. The highways and roads will be clogged. Gas stations will have no fuel.

You will collide with others in the wilderness hunting for food. You might find water, but no source of grains, sugars, and long-term sustenance.

If you do, someone will take it from you.

Better to stock up on long-shelf life foods --- Beans, Rice, Bacon, Cured Beef, and Bourbon.

The minute you are on the road you become a target of predators.

It is not easy to escape an ambush.

Better to hunker down, enlist your neighbors for support, and defend your little corner of Earth.
 

no2gates

Supereme IT Overlord
TGT Supporter
Aug 31, 2013
2,035
113
Grand Prairie, TX
If you bug out what will you leave behind? Family heirlooms, important documents (birth certificates, bank statements, medical records, etc.).

Thinking of just yourself, or do family and neighbors come to mind?

Unless you are in a flood plain or next to a nuclear power plant that is melting down, it is best to stay put.

If society collapses, millions of others will try to do what you wish to do. The highways and roads will be clogged. Gas stations will have no fuel.

You will collide with others in the wilderness hunting for food. You might find water, but no source of grains, sugars, and long-term sustenance.

If you do, someone will take it from you.

Better to stock up on long-shelf life foods --- Beans, Rice, Bacon, Cured Beef, and Bourbon.

The minute you are on the road you become a target of predators.

It is not easy to escape an ambush.

Better to hunker down, enlist your neighbors for support, and defend your little corner of Earth.
I've scanned all important documents and have it backed up on multiple thumb drives, DVD's, at my office, parents house, in the car, in my safe, up on Dropbox, on Google Drive.

Have spare food, water, and medical supplies for up to 10 people for 3 weeks, or just the 2 of us for much longer.

Have guns and ammo to make sure no one will take anything from us.

Also, multiple sources of water catchment.

Multiple ways to make fire.

Purchase food stocks when they're on sale and put dates on everything with a Sharpie and once every 2 months, see what is going to expire in a few months and rotate it out into your normal food pantry.
 

M. Sage

TGT Addict
Jan 21, 2009
16,326
36
San Antonio
Bug out - What I need to stay alive for an extended period. Sleeping bag, ground pad, food, a bivvy or single-person tent, food, at least a gallon - gallon and a half of water, camping cook set, water purification system of some kind (because trust me, the water you can carry won't last long), clean socks, hygiene kit, at least two methods of making fire...

Basically all the crap I lug along on a backpacking trip. If it isn't enough to keep you alive for at least a week (and set you up for longer-term survival) without anybody lending you a hand, you're wrong.
 

HKaltwasser

Well-Known
Oct 1, 2010
1,151
113
Dripping Springs, Just west of weird
Bugout evac bag- Cash, water, snacks, clothes, and important documents. Would be in a car, so my guns and ammo would ride along with all of my silver and small family heirlooms....assuming something damaging was coming our way.


INCH (I'm never coming home) bag- MRE's, calorie bars, matches in dry container,lighters, snugtite sleeplight sleeping bag,ground mat,fleck shelter halves/poncho system,socks,sardines,freeze dried food,camelbak, water treatment tabs,straw filter,ammo,first aid,collapsable fish rod,multiple knives, bayonet,multi tool,para cord,small cook set, 3 piece canteen,toothbrush/paste..I know I've forgot a couple of things. This is a rare scneario that sucks to think about.
Here a pic of some of my INCH contents:



I would burry a re supply cache some where to come back to.
 
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M. Sage

TGT Addict
Jan 21, 2009
16,326
36
San Antonio
One other thought: If you have a bag, you need to be in shape to freakin' use it. Shoulder that pack and go for a walk.

And you need to not only be able to carry it, but to be able to use it. I highly recommend some wilderness camping trips as educational tools. You pick up skills, you get comfortable using your equipment and you can figure out what equipment works, what doesn't, and adjust as necessary.
 

OnyxATX

Active Member
Sep 24, 2013
291
16
Austin, TX
M. Sage - YES.

I take mine with me when I go hunting, and walking in the woods with that much weight is a whole different world. For me, I have a three tier system.

1) Shoulder bag that has a G26, extra mag, paracord, pry bar, compass, whistle, good first aid kit, gloves, batteries, ear pro, water treatment, emergency blankets, super glue, basic tools, multi tool, a couple cliff bars, money, pens, notepad, and some things like that. It's small, light weight, and it's damn near an EDC. (if not on me, it's in the car.) It's my "get home" bag if the car breaks down, get lost hiking, I need a first aid kit, or whatever else thing that happens for surviving in the short term.

2) The 72 hour bag that's set up for roughly a week. Same basic stuff as above, but also clothes, a tarp, more food, mags, etc. It's my "I have no idea when I may be back to society, so it's as much as I can realistically carry on me." I guess that's the 'evac' bag.

3) Rubbermade tubs with a lid in the vehicle. Spare boots, more spare clothes, extra tarps, tent, sleeping bag, blankets, 4-6 gallons of water, more tools, fishing gear, axe, garbage bags, extra skinning knife, sugar and deer corn, few boxes of ammo, and all the things that are too heavy to carry in a pack for extended periods of time.
 

txinvestigator

TGT Addict
May 28, 2008
14,119
113
Ft Worth, TX
One other thought: If you have a bag, you need to be in shape to freakin' use it. Shoulder that pack and go for a walk.

And you need to not only be able to carry it, but to be able to use it. I highly recommend some wilderness camping trips as educational tools. You pick up skills, you get comfortable using your equipment and you can figure out what equipment works, what doesn't, and adjust as necessary.

I regret not having been in the Boy Scouts.
 

codygjohnson

Eats breakfast everyday
Lifetime Member
Nov 11, 2009
1,678
36
Flower Mound
I regret not having been in the Boy Scouts.
It's never too late to take a backpacking trip to Big Bend... A 55 year old retired tanker and I get out for a long 4 day trek through some mountains about once a year. I've been backpacking for 25 years, but he just picked it up a few years ago and loves it.
 
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