Compensator for Springfield Range Officer

Discussion in 'Handguns' started by jcb7469, Oct 26, 2013.

  1. jcb7469

    jcb7469 New Member

    Hey folks I have a question regarding the Springfield Range officer and a Compensator.

    Does a compensator like the ones sold at Brownells make a noticeable difference?
    The website says it requires a two piece guide rod as well.

    Doese anyone have any guidance, and or recomendations for which particular one to buy?
     


  2. SIG_Fiend

    SIG_Fiend Administrator TGT Supporter Admin

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    Compensators are relatively useless on stock production guns running standard pressure ammo. You will notice a difference in the recoil impulse, usually with a feeling of the gun being forced back down after cycling. It's an odd feeling, unless it's on the right gun with the right ammo and with the shooter properly "timed" to the gun. The best use of a compensator on a pistol is for running hotter loads or handloads and fine tuning the recoil impulse in conjunction with the load to achieve maximum control over muzzle flip. Pretty much race gun stuff. On a factory production gun running standard pressure ammo, sometimes it can lead to a very clunky feeling recoil impulse, or potentially the comps characteristics on a given gun and ammo load might not be well matched and may force the muzzle down too much, so with your followthrough the muzzle isn't returning on target but past that and down.
     
  3. jcb7469

    jcb7469 New Member

    If you had a range officer what would you change/upgrade?
     
  4. 40Arpent

    40Arpent TGT Addict TGT Supporter

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    What is the gun not doing for you that makes you feel a need to change/upgrade anything?
     
  5. jcb7469

    jcb7469 New Member

    its honestly functioning fine or was when I left for Afghanistan, im just wondering what I could do to make it run better or just more custom. Im wondering if putting a mag well and or the magwell mainspring housing combo is a good idea or just a waste of time. Would the little 8 dollar front strap checkering piece from brownells be worth the effort?
     
  6. 40Arpent

    40Arpent TGT Addict TGT Supporter

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    As is, it will serve you well for years and thousands of rounds. A magwell is a good addition for easing reloads at speed, but if you're going to carry it, be aware that the magwell adds a bit of length to the grip, which is the most obtrusive part of the gun when attempting to conceal. If you feel like you need more purchase on the front strap, that Brownells part might help. You can also try skateboard tape. Bottom line: if it ain't broke, don't fix it.

    Best thing you can do, if you haven't already, is buy some quality mags, like Wilson or Tripp.
     
  7. Texasjack

    Texasjack TGT Addict TGT Supporter

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    Your questions are confusing because you're describing things kinda backwards. If you can state what it is that you're trying to accomplish, you will probably get more helpful responses than describing what you're thinking about buying without explaining why.

    There are tons of things that can be done to a 1911. You can easily spend more than the original cost of the pistol on upgrades (which is why people who've gone through that process tell new guys to save their pennies and buy a more dressed-out pistol to begin with.) Some upgrades will help with shooting, but many are just cosmetic or handling tweaks.

    The Springfield RO is a pretty decent 1911, right out of the box. What would you like to improve? Is the trigger crisp? (Springfield triggers are usually not bad - I had a Colt with a trigger like a sponge and a $75 trigger job made it shoot WAY better.) Are you good with the sights? Maybe some Trijicons. If you really want to make a pistol look "yours", then consider some nicer grips - and that can go a couple of ways, like deep grooved rubber versus some really nice wood or synthetics. A mag well is nice if you're shooting competitively, but isn't going to do much for normal range shooting. SIG_Fiend's advice on the compensator is dead on the money, as is the later advice to buy quality magazines.
     
  8. Andy

    Andy Active Member

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    Depends on the caliber and the design of the comp.

    Comps have more pressure to work with (that is, a greater difference in effect) in higher-pressure calibers such as .38 Super and even 9mm over the .45acp, although you'll notice a slight decrease in muzzle-flip with a well-designed comp in .45

    Don't customize without a plan - there should be some benefit you gain from it, whether practical or looks.

    Good mags - definitely. I used to be a fan of Wilson mags, but less so over time (mostly due to the design and material in their polymer follower) - nowadays I've standardized on Chip McCormick Power mags.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2013
  9. jcb7469

    jcb7469 New Member

    Honestly, I just want to tinker. After a litlte bit of thought Im thinking maybe I should buy a busted or cheaper quality gun and play with that and leave the RO alone?
     
  10. Andy

    Andy Active Member

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    Rock Island Armory 1911, perhaps. They're inexpensive but decent quality and are great for tinkering with. That's why I originally bought mine - but I didn't expect it to be good enough become my primary, which it was and did :)
     


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