Flintlock or Percussion Cap Muskets

Discussion in 'Rifles' started by Texas1911, Jul 24, 2009.

  1. Texas1911

    Texas1911 TGT Addict

    May 29, 2017
    Austin, TX
    Does anyone own any fireable muskets? I've always wanted either a Brown Bess or Springfield musket as I love history and think it'd be alot of fun to take one of these out to the range.

    Who are some good manufacturers? Are there any particular models to look out for?

    I'm not sure if I want a flintlock or a percussion cap musket. I'm kinda leaning towards a flintlock.
     


  2. Charley

    Charley Active Member

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    Aug 7, 2008
    San Antonio
    What you want wil depnd on where your hearet is. If you are looking for a smoothbore, flint is the way to go. Many more choices with percussion, but mostly riflemuskets.

    I wanted a smoothbore but something a little lighter and easier carrying than a musket, bought a fowler from Jim Chambers, DBA Flintlocks Inc. It's a 20 bore, light and easy, shoots well with ball or shot. I've even hunted doves with it.

    If you DO decide to get a flinter, buy the best you can find, either from someone like Chambers or Track of the Wolf. Nothing in the world more frustrating than dealing with a balky flinter whose geometry is all wrong. A flintlock that has the proper geometry and is well tuned will be as fast as percussion gun, not that click..boom BS that many cheap guns will do.

    My fowler is Chamber's Pennsylvania Fowler, but the New England Colonial Fowler/Militia Musket might be closer to what you want.
    http://www.flintlocks.com/rifles03.htm
    http://www.flintlocks.com/rifles04.htm
     
  3. Big country

    Big country TGT Addict

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    Mar 6, 2009
    Cedar Park,TX
    I have an in-line BP right now but I would also like to throw a word in here for Hawkins percussion cap I think they make a rifle and a carbine length not sure about that tho. I have shot one and I liked it more than the in-line I have now. I know nothing about flint locks tho. Good luck.
     
  4. Texas1911

    Texas1911 TGT Addict

    May 29, 2017
    Austin, TX
    Thanks Charlie.
     
  5. M. Sage

    M. Sage TGT Addict

    Jan 21, 2009
    San Antonio
    I've had the itch for a longrifle for a while now...
     
  6. Charley

    Charley Active Member

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    Aug 7, 2008
    San Antonio
    Remember, muskets, rifles, and riflemuskets are all different.
    Muskets are smoothbores, and historicly were primarily flint, although conversions to percussion were common later on.
    Rifle, kinda obviously, were rifled. Most early rifles in the Americas were designed for patch round balls. Early ones are were flint, later ones percussion. Many flinters were converted to percussion as well.
    Riflemuskets were military arms, designed to fire an elomgated bullet rather than ball, but were also designed to be able to load much faster than the traditional rifle with patched roundball. Almost all were percussion.


    Here's a shot of my flinters. Top to bottom, replica of a .54 caliber M1803 rifle, AKA the Harpers Ferry. Mine is an Italian copy, and while it loks decent, the lock is a POS. I've had to spend a consdierable amount of time and effort getting it to be reliable, and it is still a so-so shooter. I sure don't recommend this one!

    Second from top, A Dixie Arms Tennessee rifle in .32. Made in Japan, quite a few years back. Decent small game rifle. Very cheap to shoot, that .310 ball doesn't equal much lead, and powder charges are vey small!

    Third from top, a Pennsylvania Fowler from Flintlocks, Inc parts and kit. Long but light, very fast handling. Shoots well with ball or shot, great for small game. I'm still trying to get a shot at a whitetail with this one. I'm curious to see what a .610 ball will do. I've wingshot doves with this one, very fast ignition.

    Bottom, a Poorboy type long rifle in .45, built from Track of the Wolf parts. Good shooter, fast and reliable. My favorite muzzleloader for whitetails.
     

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