Hyosung GT650R

Vertari

New Member
Oct 18, 2013
13
1
Austin, Texas
So, I recently got my M endorsement and insurance on my motorcycle. This coming week it is supposed to come out of the repair shop and I'm 50/50 on it. I received the bike pretty much as a gift but it wasn't working at the time. I tried repairing several items on it but when those failed to start the bike, I decided to take it to someone who knew what they were doing.

I'm looking forward to having the bike up and running...I love how the chick at the repair shop told me that it was "alive" again. :) ...But, I'll be riding it for the first time soon. It's got me somewhat apprehensive about it. I'm essentially a novice on motorcycle riding and this bike is 650CCs which isn't the best engine size for a novice to really get going on. In my training, I was on a 250CC cruiser. I loved that cruiser though. I've taken my friend's cruiser out a couple of times and I'm not sure but his might be a 650CC. I think it is more in the 500 range though.

Mine is a sport bike..."crotch rocket" I guess would fit that description a bit better. It is pretty much fundamentally different from a cruiser which I've had the most experience on.

So, that's my project. I'll let yall know how it progresses.
 

UncleSamsMisguidedChild

Active Member
Feb 25, 2013
992
36
San Antonio
I can tell you, my first bike was a 650, a vstar custom, and I loved it. I out grew it pretty quick, but don't let the cc fool you. That bike will only go as fast as your wrist turns it, so with proper self discipline, you could start on any size engine. Enjoy her, and the open road (responsibly).

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S4 while dropping an Obama
 

M. Sage

TGT Addict
Jan 21, 2009
16,326
36
San Antonio
So, I recently got my M endorsement and insurance on my motorcycle. This coming week it is supposed to come out of the repair shop and I'm 50/50 on it. I received the bike pretty much as a gift but it wasn't working at the time. I tried repairing several items on it but when those failed to start the bike, I decided to take it to someone who knew what they were doing.

I'm looking forward to having the bike up and running...I love how the chick at the repair shop told me that it was "alive" again. :) ...But, I'll be riding it for the first time soon. It's got me somewhat apprehensive about it. I'm essentially a novice on motorcycle riding and this bike is 650CCs which isn't the best engine size for a novice to really get going on. In my training, I was on a 250CC cruiser. I loved that cruiser though. I've taken my friend's cruiser out a couple of times and I'm not sure but his might be a 650CC. I think it is more in the 500 range though.

Mine is a sport bike..."crotch rocket" I guess would fit that description a bit better. It is pretty much fundamentally different from a cruiser which I've had the most experience on.

So, that's my project. I'll let yall know how it progresses.
Engine size/newbie-friendliness depends a LOT on how the engine is built. You can't go just by displacement. I've ridden 650 that were tame, good low and mid-range, predictable and not overpowered - good beginner bike (around 70hp). But I've been on 600 cc bikes (specifically sport bikes) whose engines were peaky, all power at the top end, harder to predict the power curve and very powerful for something to ride on the street (more like 120hp).

Sport bikes can be a mofo to learn on IMO because the seating position sucks for anything but racing. They're harder to control at low speed, they're not at all comfortable for rides more than about 15 minutes, and the engine's power curve is less than ideal for a new rider.
 

Younggun

Ginger Avenger
TGT Supporter
Admin
Jul 31, 2011
50,641
113
hill co.
Most cruisers are bigger than 650. I have a small cruiser and it is a 950. That said the crossover from crotch rocket to cruiser isn't quite the same. Your 650 sport bike will smoke my 950 cruiser, gearing, power bands, and rev limits are way different

As others have said, the biggest threat will be other drivers of course this rule only hold true if you ride inside your skill level. The majority of motorcycle accidents are actually single vehicle accidents in turns. The rider feels he is going to fast and tries to brake, or less often, he actually is going to fast. After that is cages turning left in from of bikes.

If you stay aware and leave plenty of cushion between how you ride and what your skill level actually is you will be fine. Get out of the city where you can relax a little and don't have to watch 100 cars around you. It will get easier as the actions on the bike become more natural and instinctive. It's tough to ride in traffic while having to think about the controls.

If you can, find a big empty parking lot to run around in and get a good feel for the brakes, take offs, and low speed maneuvers. Learning to just relax while staying vigilant is the key.
 

M. Sage

TGT Addict
Jan 21, 2009
16,326
36
San Antonio
Nah, he's alright. That's a 650cc V twin that's only a little undersquare and the specs I found say it's good for around 75 hp at around 9000 RPM. Should be a good learner bike, other than the sport bike seating position.

ETA: I don't like my feet out front like on cruisers, either.
 

Pilgrim

Well-Known
TGT Supporter
Aug 12, 2012
1,817
36
Volente
My first streetbike was a Kawasaki EX500 then I graduated to a Honda Hawk GT650 a year later. Since then I've swung my legs over a Kazasaki ZX-11, CBR600F2, Ducati Monster, Kawsaki ZX6, a great old Honda CB550 Supersport, Suzuki SV650, and VFR Interceptor... in no paticular order. It's not so much the displacement as it is weight and seat height that's a factor for beginners. Just learn to be smooth on the throttle and you'll be fine.

And for the record, I love torquey V-twins like Miley Cyrus loves twerking.... hmmm, maybe not the best analogy.
 

45tex

TGT Addict
Feb 1, 2009
2,768
113
In the early '70s I cruised California on a 1964 CB 160 Honda. It made 10 HP so was allowed on the freeways. Then 85 mph was not an uncommon speed limit. God knows I was never going to run away from anybody, but I could hold my own. If a HS kid had a 350cc bike he was doing well. Its not the engine displacement as much as knowing what you can and can't do with that bike. Ride side streets and have fun while learning the limits of the bike and you. Then keep doing it. Yeah its dangerous, but you understand that going in. Hanging out at the range with 30 armed guys you don't know is not exactly safe. If its for you, you will know, and if not, there are more dangerous hobbies. If it ceases to be fun, do something else.
 
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