I'm considering posting a review on YouTube. Tips?

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  • breakingcontact

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    Oct 16, 2012
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    Indianapolis
    Yes, I'll post it here so you all can criticize me.

    What tips do you have for making a good review video?

    I don't have proper lighting or a nice camera.

    I'm mostly just considering this for fun and to increase networking and community.

    What programs do people typically use to edit their videos?
     

    Moonpie

    Omnipotent Potentate for hire.
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    Oct 4, 2013
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    Gunz are icky.
    Show the item from all angles and usage positions.
    Thorough technical description - weight, dimensions, comparison against competing product, materials of construction, real world cost and/or availability, etc.

    Keep your face OUT of the vid unless it needs to be shown.
    We should see your hands on the item, manipulating it. Not you holding it up in front of your face.

    Stay on topic! I don't want to hear your ramblings or opinions on anything except the item under review.
    Keep it short. It shouldn't take 20 bleepin' minutes to describe a simple item like a knife. Write a script beforehand.
     

    TxBigfoot

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    Aug 10, 2011
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    What Moonpie said. I hate nutnfancy's 45min of rambling. Keep it short and to the point. There's a lot of good reviewers on youtube, but there's also a lot of people who love to hear themselves talk.
     

    dreyes89

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    Jun 8, 2012
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    I think Sony vegas, or you can always use windows movie maker(for time being).

    You can always download it and use a key generator to get codes to not have a trial version of vegas.

    Googling around I saw pinnacle, and avid studio.
     
    Last edited:

    benenglish

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    Nov 22, 2011
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    A crappy camera can produce wonderful video if you can hold it still. Handheld video in a review vid is just stupid.

    A tripod, clamp-pod, or camera stand is your friend.
     

    mitchntx

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    Jan 15, 2012
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    Waco-ish
    I've been producing, shooting and editing for 30 years ... started on 1" reel-to-reel at KLTV in Tyler, Texas. Even spliced a little 16mm ...

    Identify your audience and:
    know what they want to hear
    know what you need to say to get there
    know your subject so you don;t ramble or repeat
    keep it simple and don't use tongue twisting or complicated words.

    Practice:
    your lines (use cue cards)
    your action (know your movements and block the shot so you don;t go off camera)
    your content (say what you need to say ... only)

    Rule of thumb to get folks to watch and learn:
    3 points in 3 minutes (today videos are everywhere, so make your relevant)
    frame the shot (divide the screen into thirds and keep what you are describing framed where the upper and middle third intersect)
    Create a set (don't shoot it in a bathroom or kitchen with hard surfaces where the audio echoes. Pay attention to your back ground)

    Lighting is key. Sunlight is your friend. Don't mix lighting.

    Clean audio ... like said before.

    I use Avid and Adobe Production Suite at work.
    But at home, I have a $49 version of Adobe Premiere Elements.
     

    Mic

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    Jan 3, 2009
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    Austin
    I've been producing, shooting and editing for 30 years ... started on 1" reel-to-reel at KLTV in Tyler, Texas. Even spliced a little 16mm ...

    Identify your audience and:
    know what they want to hear
    know what you need to say to get there
    know your subject so you don;t ramble or repeat
    keep it simple and don't use tongue twisting or complicated words.

    Practice:
    your lines (use cue cards)
    your action (know your movements and block the shot so you don;t go off camera)
    your content (say what you need to say ... only)

    Rule of thumb to get folks to watch and learn:
    3 points in 3 minutes (today videos are everywhere, so make your relevant)
    frame the shot (divide the screen into thirds and keep what you are describing framed where the upper and middle third intersect)
    Create a set (don't shoot it in a bathroom or kitchen with hard surfaces where the audio echoes. Pay attention to your back ground)

    Lighting is key. Sunlight is your friend. Don't mix lighting.

    Clean audio ... like said before.

    I use Avid and Adobe Production Suite at work.
    But at home, I have a $49 version of Adobe Premiere Elements.

    Now that sounds like the kind of advice you need!
     

    Chirpy

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    3   0   0
    Feb 2, 2013
    1,189
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    Hutto, TX (kinda)
    If you have a window or even a shop light bouncing off white poster board or even tinfoil from the opposite (dark side) of the subject is a great low rent way to get fill light.

    Even a good flash light bounced is better than nothing, just don't shine directly.

    More info and a couple of pictures of fancy reflectors

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reflector_(photography)


    Sent from magic cutting board
     
    Last edited:

    shortround

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    Jan 24, 2011
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    I saw one today that was entertaining. Simple camera, close up shot of a .22 Semi-Auto pistol and some ammo, then some ranting and raving about how the gun chokes on every brand of ammo he tested. Cut away to a view of the disassembled pistol on his work bench, then to a stationary shot of a far wall in his garage after he said he was going to fix the pistol. In the background, you could hear him cuss and swear as he used every power tool he had to "fix" that sorry gun. There was banging, clanging, torching, grinding, drilling, and pounding and lots of cussing.

    When he returned for a close up of his handiwork, he simply replaced the ratty gun with a slick little Ruger MK.

    It was a short amateur video, but it held my attention for all of 2 minutes and 39 seconds.

    Keep it short, simple, and BLUF (Bottom Line up Front).
     
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