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Looking for some help with ammo for a Webley Mk. II converted to .45ACP

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by CrankyBuddha, Oct 14, 2013.

  1. CrankyBuddha

    CrankyBuddha Member

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    Aug 26, 2013
    Houston, TX
    My grandfather left me a Webley Mk.II that was converted to fire .45 ACP from half moon clips. The Mk.II was in services for only a few years in the 1890's and was designed to fire a black powder cartridge and is generally not considered to be safe in firing modern .45 ACP ammunition.

    I would like to fire this weapon at least once but I don't want to risk using modern ammunition.

    I have some loading data collected from Webley-centric sites and forums on the Internet but since I am not a reloader the data means very little to me.

    Is there anyone out there who would work with me to produce a few rounds of ammunition that would be safe to use?

    Thanks

    -Cranky
     


  2. ArmyZach

    ArmyZach Active Member

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    Aug 21, 2013
    Joshua
    FWIW-
    The opinion of a reloader with some experience with vintage/antique arms:

    The Webley Mk II was developed to fire the .455 Webley, originally a black powder cartridge, but later smokeless powder (cordite) was used in the loads. The revolver saw service through WWII. Your particular revolver, converted to 45 ACP, saw use with that caliber.

    I would have no problem firing 45 ACP through it. We are not talking Damascus barrels here, this is a solid hunk of steel that proved it's worth with it's extended service record. Your particular revolver has probably fired hundreds? of rounds of 45 ACP.

    I would recommend using lead bullets only, no FMJ. Black Hills Ammunition has suitable ammo for purchase, the classic 230 grain lead round.

    There is also a rimmed 45 round called 45 CS (cowboy special) that is a 45 LC (long colt) cut down to 45 ACP length. This is a typically a light load for single action shooting - a benefit with your concerns. Also, this round would function without the moon clips. All loaded with a lead bullet, usually a 200 grain or less projectile.

    The ability of the revolver to handle 45 ACP is not the real question. My biggest concern would be the timing of the revolver. Does it lock up tight (no wiggle in the cylinder when cocked), and does the cylinder index properly on the barrel/forcing cone?

    Please ask around and second guess my recommendation, but like I said, I personally would have no reservations in using it if the timing looked solid.

    Congrats on having such a cool pistol with a real history to it. I would love to own one myself.
     
  3. Paul5388

    Paul5388 Active Member

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    Feb 17, 2013
    Rusk County
    The rimmed cartridge is the .45 AR, which stands for auto rimmed and was intended for use in M1917 handguns in either Colt or S&W, making it unnecessary to use moon clips. The rim on .45 Colt and it's offspring it much different than a .45 auto or .45 AR.

    Use ACP brass and black powder if you need to reduce the pressure. Just make sure you compress your black powder, or use a wad.
     
  4. Andy

    Andy Active Member

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    Sep 13, 2013
    Dallas, TX
    Hi, Cranky

    I'd like to see what data you have - I use Clays powder and cast my own 200gr SWC and 230gr RN bullets, so I'm not sure whether or not I'd be able to help with ammo, as Clays is pretty fast-burning ie. fairly powerful - but I'd like the chance to at least try and help.

    With that said, the usual caveats apply - I don't want money and while I can load good ammo (have been doing so for decades), I have no idea what your revolver can handle.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2013
  5. CrankyBuddha

    CrankyBuddha Member

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    Aug 26, 2013
    Houston, TX
    Thanks Andy,

    This is the information I pulled form one of the forums:

    "I load for my Mark II with 3 grains of Bullseye with a 250 grain Remington swaged bullet that comes sized to .454 or .455; IIRC. Lube the bullet with LLA."


    Being fairly new to guns and and completely ignorant when it comes to reloading this means nothing to me.

    -Cranky
     
  6. Andy

    Andy Active Member

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    Sep 13, 2013
    Dallas, TX
    Sorry about the delay in responding, Cranky, I've been running to and from hospitals of late.

    Bullseye - darnit. I don't have that powder, nor do I have that heavier .45 LC bullet, the 250gr. The heaviest I have is a 230gr - not really a big deal in itself, but my sizing die swages it down to .452" - a lot smaller than the .454/5 he's talking about.

    Someone who loads cowboy loads would have that style bullet and might use Bullseye, too - do you know anyone in the SASS/Cowboy Action leagues, perhaps?
     

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