Mosin Nagant Rifle (Dallas area)

hornetguy

Member
Feb 21, 2021
77
18
Allen, Texas
An M44 is an M38 with a bayo.
After a little study on the interspace, I checked out my partially bubba'd Mosin. It is indeed a 1954 Romanian M44. Who'd a thunk that my $90 thumper would end up being one of the more uncommon variants of the Mosin? Life goes on....
 

echo1

"A free people should be armed and disciplined"
Feb 8, 2021
96
33
KALI
After a little study on the interspace, I checked out my partially bubba'd Mosin. It is indeed a 1954 Romanian M44. Who'd a thunk that my $90 thumper would end up being one of the more uncommon variants of the Mosin? Life goes on....
The big box stores that were selling Mosins for $75 bucks, paid no never mind to the weapons origin or year of production. PAX
 

majormadmax

Úlfhéðnar
Aug 27, 2009
13,716
113
San Antonio!
The big box stores that were selling Mosins for $75 bucks, paid no never mind to the weapons origin or year of production. PAX
Those were round receiver M91/30s, which were made in the tens of millions and are extremely common albeit a bit more expensive today (I picked up my first one 15 years ago for $99 with a spam can of 440 rounds of 7.62x54RR ammo). Occasionally you might find a hex receiver or one from the less common countries, but for the most part they were Tulas or Izhevsks.

The carbines were always a bit rare and cost a bit more.

After WWII the Soviet Union shared much of its weapons technology with its satellite countries, including the Mosin rifles and carbines.

M44s were produced in the 1950s by Romania and other than minor differences they followed the same pattern as the post war Soviet M44s. The Romanian M44 utilizes sights identical to the later pattern Soviet M44. The rear sight base has a slight curve from the rear ending at a rounded area for the leaf pin and is a sleeve which fits around the barrel and is held in place with one pin at the rear. The graduations are marked on the top of the leaf from 1 to 10 representing hundreds of meters. The front sight base is a long sleeve which also incorporates the folding bayonet lug and is held in place with two pins, one at the rear of the sight base itself and one vertically at the bayonet lug. The forward section of the barrel is smaller in diameter forming a shoulder at the rear of the sleeve. The post and globe is the same type as the later wide Soviet assembly. Romanian cleaning rods typically match the Soviet rods, but are marked with an "arrowhead in a triangle."

Everything you could want to know about the Mosin-Nagant can be found here:

 

OLDVET

Well-Known
Dec 14, 2009
1,956
83
Richardson, Texas
I will get photos of rifle and accessories this weekend. I will post it for sale next Monday.
I bought this rifle several years ago from my local gun store. At the time I had an M1 Garand, an M14, and a Rock River AR. I thought it would be cool to have a rifle that might have been used in WWII to eliminate Nazis. The price was right, so I brought it home.
It became like several other of my firearms, I never got around to shoot it.

After I bought the rifle, I met a older Marine Vet while shopping at The Southwest Ammo store in Mesquite. He told me he and a buddy tried to blow up a Mosin Nagant by shooting maxed out reloads. He said the rifle stood the testing, so they gave up. Not something I would ever try on an old rifle, but interesting results.
Thank for the interest.
 

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