My rifle collection

Discussion in 'Rifles' started by phatcyclist, Feb 23, 2008.

  1. phatcyclist

    phatcyclist Active Member

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    Feb 22, 2008
    Austin, TX
    I've got a few rifles.

    First up is my Mosin 91/30. I have hunted deer with it, and it is one of my favorite rifles. It was very cheap, and the ammunition is everywhere. Mine is a 1939 made at the Tula arsenal. The bore is in very good condition.

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    Next up is a Swiss K-31 straight-pull rifle. Instead of a traditional bolt that you work by lifting the bolt and then bringing it back, this rifle operates by pulling the bolt-handle straight-back, then pushing it straight-forward. This rifle was produced in 1949. These rifles never saw actual military service, and never suffered from "wartime production" where loose tolerances and tooling marks were rampant on most military rifles. These rifles operate like fine Swiss watches, very smooth and well machined.

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    Next up is a Tikka T3 in .308 Winchester. I recently purchased this rifle for long-range shooting and a lightweight alternative to my other bolt-action rifles. These pictures show a Simmons scope mounted, but it failed while I was sighting it in. I currently have a 30 year old Tasco 4x40 on there, sighted in and ready to go.

    [​IMG]

    I also have a Smith and Wesson M&P15 M4 clone and my first rifle, which is a Marlin bolt-action .22. I don't have pictures of these at the moment, but I will update this thread and post some.
     


  2. Texas1911

    Texas1911 TGT Addict

    May 29, 2017
    Austin, TX
    I like the K31 :)
     
  3. ReVrEnD_0341

    ReVrEnD_0341 Active Member

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    I'm liking the K31 as well. Those Tikka rifles are supposed to be awesome tack drivers. How does the action feel? I am down for a full blown review on it. I've read articles on them, but you know how gun writers are. They think every new thing they get to shoot is the "future of firearms"
     
  4. SIG_Fiend

    SIG_Fiend Administrator TGT Supporter Admin

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    Nice collection Nolan! Man, I'm just itching for a good old bolt action now. I've always loved the Kar 98's but, what in your opinion is one of the best bolt actions out there from that era? I'm talking within a reasonable price range though as I would probably never want to shell out $3k+ for some uber-rare rifle that is too expensive to shoot. I've shot Alan's K98 a few times and like it a lot, though I must confess I don't have much experience with other rifles from the WWI and II era.
     
  5. phatcyclist

    phatcyclist Active Member

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    The Tikka rifle is great. The action is quite smooth, especially when you think of the price range the rifle is in. They blued models have cro-moly barrels, which definitely lends itself to the accuracy. The chamber is pillar bedded from the factory, and the barrels are free-floated.

    I don't have much time with this rifle, but so far I have been incredibly impressed. The first two shots I put through it at 50 yards went through the exact same hole. The action is easy to work, and the fit and finish are really nice. The trigger is factory adjustable down to 2 lbs (where mine is set at). It breaks cleanly, without much travel at all. In .308, it doesn't make too much fuss, but it is a light rifle. at 6 1/2lbs, it would not be a good cadidate for some of the heavier-hitting calibers they offer them in, like .338 Winchester magnum.

    I did a lot of comparison between this rifle and the venerable Remington 700. I also looked briefly at a Remington 798 (Mauser action with receiver-safety). But after the targets I was seeing made by Tikka owners, I took a chance on the "underdog". I have been really happy with my decision.
     
  6. phatcyclist

    phatcyclist Active Member

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    I don't blame you for not wanting to drop a fortune. The Mauser K98 is a great rifle. They were very well made, and the actions are strong. There is only one small issue I have with the Mauser. 8mm Mauser is a fantastic caliber, really it is a shame that it didn't stick around longer. The problem is that you are basically limited to surplus, or the small pickens that is factory rounds. Surplus is also getting scarce, with only the really crappy stuff still available in small quantities most times. You could hand-load for it, but you will spend way more on the equipment than the rifle.

    Personally, I would consider a late-production US 1903A3, or a US 1917. Both are .30-06, which is an incredibly popular caliber, and easy to come by. There was so much surplus made, that it is still available. Not to mention, the rifles are very well made, and are incredibly accurate. The action is a modified Mauser, so it would be familiar to you. I would have probably ended up with one of these if I hadn't already invested in .308.

    I always recommend Mosin M91/30s to people, just because they are great rifles. A lot of people don't think they are any good because of their origins, but I have to disagree with them. The caliber is also easy enough to get. Not as plentiful as .30-06, but nowhere near as limited as 8mm Mauser. You can even find non-corrosive surplus for cheap locally. I think the 1903A3 or 1917 would be a better choice for someone who would like to walk into any sporting goods store and pickup rounds though.
     
  7. Texas1911

    Texas1911 TGT Addict

    May 29, 2017
    Austin, TX
    Yeah for a wartime bolt-action the 1903 is a hot ticket. They've gone up in value lately too. I've been half-assed looking for one.
     
  8. phatcyclist

    phatcyclist Active Member

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    Travis, I have another idea for your search. You could always spend less than what you would on a 1903A3, on a new production Remington 798. It's a mauser action with a few twists. It has the same feeding and bolt design as the original, but with a receiver-mounted safety (better for scope clearance). It has an adjustable trigger, and a gunsmith could get that down very light. They come in synthetic stock, or wood. They also run at about $500, which is maybe half of what you would spend on an 1903A3. Plus, you can still get it in .30-06, or a list of other calibers.

    Just a thought. The only thing is, I don't think they make them in open sights, so you would be looking at purchasing a scope. That added on would still cost less than an original 1903A3.
     
  9. SIG_Fiend

    SIG_Fiend Administrator TGT Supporter Admin

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    Here's what I've been considering: http://www.mauser.org/rifles/m63 tanker/index.htm

    It's a reproduction M63 Tanker Mauser and you can get them in 8mm, .308, .30-06, .270, and .243. I was considering one of these in either .30-06 or .308 since they are common calibers. For what I want, this appears to be one of the best compromises. I have thought of newer Remingtons or various other brand bolt actions, though I really want to stick to something from the World War era as I like the classical appeal. Even though these M63's are reproduction guns and not "real" war era guns, at least it shares all of the Mauser characteristics and classical appeal plus being new they should be in perfect shape.
     
  10. Texas1911

    Texas1911 TGT Addict

    May 29, 2017
    Austin, TX
    I would opt for a full length Mauser, you will have significant ballistic degradation with the shortened Tanker version. Keep in mind the K98 is already shortened from the original version.
     

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