New Sporting Clays Shotgun - Suggestions Welcome

Discussion in 'Shotguns' started by Tiller1k, Aug 22, 2009.

  1. Tiller1k

    Tiller1k New Member

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    Jul 26, 2009
    Katy
    I have been a hunter and shooter for many years but never really was into sporting clays. I recently attended a shoot and fared pretty well with a borrowed Benelli Super Black Eagle. I am considering purchasing a new shotgun to use for this purpose and possibly for some bird hunting. I have no intention to shoot turkey or anything using a 3 1/2 mag shell.

    At this point I have ruled out O/U shotguns and pumps. I would like an auto-loader. Apparently "reasonably priced" and sporting clays don't go together but I am looking to keep it fairly reasonable.

    I looked at and shouldered several different models and have narrowed down the list. Please feel free to make recommendations if they are in the same price range. It must be reliable shooting 2 3/4" 1 1/8 loads.

    Here are the contenders so far:

    Berretta AL 391 Urika 2 (High end of price range)
    Winchester SX3 Synthetic
    Franchi I-12
    Remington 11-87 Sportsman

    I was planning on purchasing a 28" bbl but saw plenty of 26" models out there as well. Anyone using a 26"? Benefits?

    Thanks in advance for your recommendations and opinions. :patriot:
     


  2. SIG_Fiend

    SIG_Fiend Administrator TGT Supporter Admin

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    Off your list, I would go with a Franchi I-12. They feel and shoot fairly similar to Benelli's from what I remember. Another decent one is the Stoeger M2000. Although not quite as nice as the Franchi's, they are still an excellent gun and tough to beat for around the ~$400-550 price range. Franchi's are usually ~$600-800.
     
  3. Tiller1k

    Tiller1k New Member

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    Jul 26, 2009
    Katy
    I looked at the Stoeger and have done some research on them for exactly the reasons you gave. Everyone has an opinion but I have read quite a few reports of malfunction and difficulty cycling lighter loads. Who knows if the claims were legit and what type of "operator error" was involved but there were some serious horror stories about this model and getting parts if they break.

    I was fairly impressed with the Franchi for the money.

    Good feedback! Thanks!
     
  4. dee

    dee Well-Known

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    I would buy a used 1100 over the new 11-87 but thats just my opinion.
     
  5. navyguy

    navyguy TGT Addict

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    DFW Keller
    I agree on the 1100 vs the 11-97, but your other choices are good.

    26 vs 28 is a personal shooting choice. You get a longer sight radius with the 28, but it does not swing as fast. The 26" is good for close in shooting and snap shooting, but not as good for long range pass shooting, with sustained lead. The 28 will generally pattern a tad better than the 26, and give you a tiny bit more velocity. I Personally like the 26". I just seem to shoot it better in the field and at skeet. Have not shot sporting clays, but from what I've seen, I think I would favor the 26".
     
  6. Tiller1k

    Tiller1k New Member

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    Jul 26, 2009
    Katy
    Thanks for the feedback. I know the 11-87 was "updated" from the 1100 and many say it was the answer to a question never asked. I really don't know what the difference is between the two. What makes the 1100 more desirable? It looks like these can still be had new though they are a bit more than the 11-87.

    I did try to find some used copies of the Remington in my search but they are few and far between. Even in used models, they were asking a mint for them. Maybe they are worth it. I just prefer to know the history on something and don't want to end up with a nice looking gun that has 20k rounds through it and will soon need repairs.
     
  7. navyguy

    navyguy TGT Addict

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    DFW Keller

    I'll answer this never having shot a 11-87, but going one what I have heard and read. The 11-87 was developed to handle the magnum loads, whereas the 1100 will only shoot standard loadings. (2 3/4) But apparently that makes 11-87 less then 100% reliable as is the 1100's reputation. Some people report absolutely no problems, and others say it's a POS.

    As far as running into an 1100 wit 20k rounds through it, I say that is possible, but not likely. Most people that own that gun will use it for casual clay shooting (you don't see many in real competition) or the occasional hunting outing. For example, I've had my 870 Wingmaster for better than 30 years, and I'd guess I've got 700-1000 rounds through it... Other than a few scratches on the stock, it's still perfect.
     
  8. robhillips

    robhillips New Member

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    Remington 1100 or browning silver same internals as an sx3 basically.
     
  9. Gutshot

    Gutshot Member

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    I own both at one time. The 1100 is a little narrower and easier to handle than the 11-87. I traded up to the 11-87 then sold it and bought a Stoeger 2000 in 12 ga. camo with 26" barrel.With it on sale at Cabalea's and with a discount coupon, I ended up paying $100 for it brand new. I don't get good deals very often. I guess it was my turn.
    Gutshot
     
  10. juwaba98

    juwaba98 Well-Known

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    Only thing I have to add is a quick question. How serious do you plan on getting with the sporting clays? If you only intend to be a casual shooter I would go with the Franchi. If you plan to be more serious about it and plan on going through a lot of rounds I would then look at the Beretta. The Franchi will literally start to fall apart when you get near 10k rounds through them. I've seen it firsthand. If you plan on much fewer rounds it should give you many years of enjoyment as most casual shooters will never reach that kind of round count. The Beretta is a great semi-auto that is well-proven and heavily favored among serious shooters who prefer the semis. The Winchester (which I would like to have) should be a great gun as well, but is not proven enough for me to actually reccomend it. I'd stay away from the Remington unless you fall into that casual shooter category and find a good used 1100 for less than the Franchi. The 1100 is like the 870 and should last you a lifetime if properly cared for. Barrel length is going to be a personal preference. I personally won't shoot anything other than a 28" on a semi-auto and actually prefer 32" barrels on my O/Us. Hope something in the above mess helps.
     

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