new to reloading

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by backdraft341, Aug 26, 2009.

  1. backdraft341

    backdraft341 New Member

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    Oct 23, 2008
    spring,tx
    what is a good reloader kit for the money? i plan on reloading 9mm, .243, 30-06 springfield. price is a factor but would like a good quality kit to get started. thanks for any info
     


  2. RCBS ROCK CHUCKER! And don't be afraid to buy a used one.
     
  3. MadMo44Mag

    MadMo44Mag TGT Addict

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    Jan 23, 2009
    Ft.Worth
    This is a very true statement but Hornaday and Lee make some fine products as well.

    Surf the web and look at basic starter kit. Remember you will also need a tumbler, case trimmer for rifle brass, a powder dispenser, calipers, manuals and other assorted tools.

    There are three basic types of press.
    1. Signal stage - cheap, slow but gets the job done.(50 rounds an hr)
    2. Turrent press - considered by many as the only way to load rifle ammo. (75 - 100 rounds an hr)
    3. Progressive press - loads fast and effectively. For those that need to run off 1000 rounds or more at a time. (125-250+ rounds an hr)
    Anyway you go you will spend some cash but if you shoot a lot it will pay for itself very quickly!
    The press needs to suit your needs.
    The more ammo you need should define the style press you get - IMO.

    Now with that said, new to reloading I suggest you get a basic starter kit with a single stage press. This gets a lot of your basic equipment and keeps cost down. It also allows you to learn the basics of reloading. Lee, RCBS and Hornaday all offer their versions of a starter kit and they are all good quality.

    The more complex the press, the more there is to go wrong and without a good set of basics in reloading that unwanted KA-Boom is more prone to happen!!!!
     
  4. backdraft341

    backdraft341 New Member

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    Oct 23, 2008
    spring,tx
    thanks for the info
     
  5. BurkGlocker

    BurkGlocker Active Member

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    Aug 24, 2009
    Burkburnett, TX
    Defiantely couldnt be more true. I did however start off on a Lee Challenger Kit and it served my purpose until I was wanting to upgrade to the big boys. It loaded many thousands of rounds over its 8 year use, but I do alot of pistol shooting and decided to upgrade to an RCBS progressive press, but also have a Rock Chucker that I load all of my rifle rounds on. Some people dont enjoy reloading as much as they thought they would (and which ones that I have met are far and few between) and now they have a reloading kit sitting in the corner and all it does is collect dust. Matter of fact, thats how I came by my presses and I got them for CHEAP.

    There is alot of work that goes into reloading; case prep, load development but those are also the joys of it as well. Nothing beats developing a load that will put every single bullet into one nice ragged hole... :banger:
     
  6. Okierifleman

    Okierifleman Active Member

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    Mar 14, 2009
    Houston
    Definately the Rock Chucker for the rifle ammo. If you can find a used kit it would be great, you cannot wear out RCBS equipment. You can upgrade at a later date on scales and prepping equipment. Check Ebay, they always have a bunch of used presses and kits for sale.

    For the 9mm, save your money and buy a Dillon Square Deal B. Unless you do not shoot very much, you just cannot produce enough pistol ammo on a singe stage to make it worth while IMHO.
     
  7. sharky47

    sharky47 Active Member

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    May 4, 2008
    I have been reloading for a little over a year now. I started by purchasing the RCBS Rockchucker master reloading kit at Basspro. I feel like I certainly got my money's worth and have loaded THOUSANDS of rounds on this setup, but here are some observations:

    1. The only thing I do not like about the Rockchucker is the spent primer collection tray. It fills up fast and is difficult to empty without making a mess. I have a Lee Classic press and it dumps the primers through the hollow ram into a 5-gal bucket, WAY better. Don't let this one thing stop you from getting a Rockchucker, because it really is a great press, just something to consider. These days I use my Rockchucker soley for seating bullets, so my complaint about the primer tray is moot...

    2. I really really like the RCBS hand primer that comes in the kit.

    3. I have pretty much replaced all my RCBS dies with Lee. I have had two RCBS die sets that were bad out of the box (different calibers) and one that isn't quite "right". The Lee "Pacesetter" sets come with a factory crimp tool, shell holder, and cost considerably less than a regular RCBS set. All of my Lee dies function flawlessly.

    4. I am extremely pleased that I started with a single-stage. Reloading is not difficult, but it does require you to know what you are doing. Single stage lets you learn nice and easy, and even with all the whiz-bang progressives you may buy later - that single stage press will still get used alot for test-batches and fixing cases and all sorts of things.
     
  8. Ranger60

    Ranger60 Active Member

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    Mar 28, 2008
    Taylor
    +1 on the RockChucker master kit, check price at Midway. I started several years ago on this setup and did many rifle and pistol rounds before going to a Dillon 550 for pistol, but still use the RockChucker for rifle.

    That being said, I also agree that products from the others are most excellent also, they will all do what you want them to do.
     
  9. Rifleman55

    Rifleman55 Member

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    Jul 17, 2008
    Dillon is still the best way to go the 550b is now $406, not exactly cheap. buy once cry once it will load nearly all rile and pistol calibers. A step up is the650 at$529. You will still need scales a case trimmer calipers and some manuals. It is easy to invest a thousand dollars in reloading equipment. As long as you can find componants you will always be able to shoot.
    A good single stage set up will be a little cheaper.
     
  10. jgedmond

    jgedmond Active Member

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    Dec 2, 2008
    Spring
    I too am just getting into reloading and bought the Hornady Lock-N-Load Classic Kit (single-stage press) along with a set of their dies for 9mm. Other than a tumbler, the kit comes with pretty much everything you need to get started.

    I especially like the "lock and load" die mounting system and the "positive priming system". I prime during the downstroke after expanding the cartridge mouth. The kit also includes a hand primer that I have tried yet. I also like the digital balance over the beam balance that comes with the RCBS kit.

    One disapointment is that the powder measure comes setup for dispensing 5 - 100 grains for rifle loads. This made my loading of 115gr 9mm at 5.8 grains a bit of a pain. I have a handgun sized rotor and measure (0.5 - 17 grains) on order.

    I do not think that you can go wrong with any brand-name kit, it's just a matter of what you are comfortable with.
     

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