POLYMER-COATED STEEL-CASED .45 ACP AMMO??

satx78247

TGT Addict
Jun 23, 2014
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113
78208
Friends,

I'm looking for INFORMATION and/or ADVICE upon firing "range ammo" made in SERBIA that is "advertised as" being "fully suitable" for use in ALL "quality, modern handguns" in my "new to me" 1911A1 "WWII STYLE" clone.
(OBVIOUSLY, ammo makers can CLAIM almost anything & I'm "too old of a bunny" to try their ammo without knowing if it is likely to be OK or not.)

I know NOTHING about such "polymer-coated steel cases" & despite the fact that the 1911A1 "clone" that i bought is just a "shooter grade" pistol, I do not want to needless damage the handgun and/or damage MYSELF, while trying to save some $$$$$. = The company's advertising states that the ammo is equal in quality to the "WWII-era US issue".
(The Serbian ammo is "said to be" 230 grain FMJ at 850FPS & about 38 cents each, IF you buy 500 pieces or more, with FREE S&H.)

yours, satx
 

TexMex247

TGT Addict
TGT Supporter
May 11, 2009
2,725
113
Leander(NW Austin)
It's probably just rebranded PPU(academy's monarch house brand). All of their stuff has been loaded to safe levels ime through a large variety of calibers I've shot.

The number one hang up with steel is the imperfect seal because it's so rigid. It's always going to leave a little more residue on your chamber since it won't seal up as well as brass as it's fired. It will dirty up a gun faster.

It may also be a little harder on your extractor. If it runs an internal extractor I would be inclined to wait til you can get some brass ammo. If it's a true Colt clone it will have the internal extractor. Either way it will shoot fine and pressure level should be a non issue.
 

satx78247

TGT Addict
Jun 23, 2014
8,288
113
78208
It's probably just rebranded PPU(academy's monarch house brand). All of their stuff has been loaded to safe levels ime through a large variety of calibers I've shot.

The number one hang up with steel is the imperfect seal because it's so rigid. It's always going to leave a little more residue on your chamber since it won't seal up as well as brass as it's fired. It will dirty up a gun faster.

It may also be a little harder on your extractor. If it runs an internal extractor I would be inclined to wait til you can get some brass ammo. If it's a true Colt clone it will have the internal extractor. Either way it will shoot fine and pressure level should be a non issue.

TexMex247,

THANK YOU for your advice.
(I've never fired a single round of steel cased ammo, much less "polymer-coated".)

yours, satx
 

TexMex247

TGT Addict
TGT Supporter
May 11, 2009
2,725
113
Leander(NW Austin)
Happy to help. The polymer cases usually have a grey appearance while the old fashioned lacqer coated are more greenish. For pistols, I prefer the polymer although I mostly shoot my reloads these days. The polymer just slows the oxidation of them but they'll still show rust in an open air setting after a while.
 

zackmars

Well-Known
Nov 4, 2015
1,619
113
Texas
It's probably just rebranded PPU(academy's monarch house brand). All of their stuff has been loaded to safe levels ime through a large variety of calibers I've shot.

The number one hang up with steel is the imperfect seal because it's so rigid. It's always going to leave a little more residue on your chamber since it won't seal up as well as brass as it's fired. It will dirty up a gun faster.

It may also be a little harder on your extractor. If it runs an internal extractor I would be inclined to wait til you can get some brass ammo. If it's a true Colt clone it will have the internal extractor. Either way it will shoot fine and pressure level should be a non issue.
I don't think PPU makes steel case, do they?
 

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