progressive press/volume reloading

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by country_boy, Aug 29, 2009.

  1. country_boy

    country_boy TGT Addict

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    Some time down the road I want to get into volume reloading.

    Ive been looking at the dillion and the horandy lock n load. My biggest problem is $$$. Which would yall recommend? Im also looking at the rcbs trim pro power case trimmer. MidwayUSA - RCBS Trim Pro Power Case Trimmer Kit 110 Volt
     


  2. MadMo44Mag

    MadMo44Mag TGT Addict

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    Both are good but Hornaday is my preference.
    After 20+ years and well over 500k rounds I have just had to send my Hornaday back to the factory for a FREE overhaul and update. According to their senior press tech they just need to replace a few parts due to normal ware and tear.
    I use to shoot over 800 rounds a weekend and did that for 10 years steady so there is over a quarter of a million rounds that came of my Hornaday Pro-Jector the forerunner of the Lock n Load.
     
  3. country_boy

    country_boy TGT Addict

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    well thats what grabbed me was the lifetime warranty.
     
  4. Bullseye Shooter

    Bullseye Shooter Active Member

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    Dillon, as well, has a lifetime warranty and they don't care if you were the original owner or not, which the same I'm sure with Hornady. I sold a Square Deal a while back and when it had a problem, the new owner sent it to Dillon and they fixed it for free.

    As to the relative differences between the Hornady and Dillon, I'll leave that to someone else to discuss. I've been using two Star Machine Works progressive presses for years for my .45 ACP and .38 Special loads and don't plan on switching any time soon.
     
  5. Okierifleman

    Okierifleman Active Member

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    Dillon for me. I have 3 Square Deal B's, one for 9mm, 1 for 40, and 1 for 45. I can put out around 300 rounds an hour. You can convert one machine, but they are fairly inexpensive(I bought all 3 of them used) so I dont have to hassle with cal. changes and adjusting powder bars, etc....Not to mention the fact they have the best customer service in the business. If you have a problem with your machine, 9 times out of 10 they can walk you through it over the phone, if you need a new part, its free and will be there in 1-2 days. Cant say any more than that.
     
  6. country_boy

    country_boy TGT Addict

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    that square b cant reload rifle rounds correct?
     
  7. Bullseye Shooter

    Bullseye Shooter Active Member

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    Correct. The SDB only loads pistol and the dies are proprietory, so they don't fit anything else. The Dillon 550, 650, etc. will load both rifle and pistol and they use std dies.
     
  8. MadMo44Mag

    MadMo44Mag TGT Addict

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    The Dillon 550, 650 and the Hornaday Lock-n-Load are the most versatile press's again - IMO!!!
     
  9. Texas42

    Texas42 TGT Addict

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    I got a dillon 550b and love it. It is manually indexing, which I actually like. I'm not in a hurry, I just want to do things faster than with a single stage.

    A 650 is fully progressive, and a 1050 is actually a commerical machine (no lifetime warrenty).

    The thing that turned me off the square deal was that you had to buy caliber kits from dillon, and they were like 60 or 70 bucks. That and I though I might want to mass produce .223's at some point in time.

    I don't know much about the hornady, but it looks nice. I think the start up was going to be a bit more expensive because it doesn't come with pistol powder charger (or something like that). I have seen parts for the lock-n-load at bass pro, and the bullet deal seemed like a good bonus. I think there is also some minor problems with some kinds of dies not fitting properly ( I think Lee dies were too long or something . . .just another set of dies this isn't personal experience, it was just something that MIGHT have been a problem. )

    Long story, if you like one or the other and it is just a few dollars difference, don't sweat the money. These things will last a while : )

    I can load something like 150-250 rounds an hour when I'm up and running, and I'm still pretty new at it.
     
  10. Okierifleman

    Okierifleman Active Member

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    I agree that the 650 would be more diverse, but I dont need a progressive press for my rifle ammo(hence the SDB's) My rifle ammo gets a lot more precision and I run individual powder charges through my electronic dispensor/scale so the need for a progressive press for my rifle ammo isnt needed. I still buy my 223 for my AR's. If a guy wanted a progressive press for handgun calibers and mass producing 223 and 308, the 650 is definately the way to go.
     

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