question m1 garand

Discussion in 'Rifles' started by landin18, Oct 28, 2009.

  1. landin18

    landin18 Member

    :gotme:ive been looking at the old 1940 to 1950 era m1 garand and i got to tell you they are growing on me. Does anyone own one of these that could give me first hand knowledge of how these guns handle and accuracy. thanks
     


  2. Bullseye Shooter

    Bullseye Shooter Active Member

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    I have a Winchester M1 that was built in 1944 that I had converted to .308 Winchester. I use it for NRA Highpower matches. In addition, there are John C. Garand matches around the state that are sponsored by the CMP. JCG matches up until this year called for an unmodified rifle, but this year they wll allow .308 Garands in an "unlimited" class.

    As you may have figured out, the M1 is chambered for the .30-06 cartridge and uses an "en bloc" clip that holds eight rounds. Garand used that design since he wanted the rifleman as low as possible to ground in the prone position. Even though 20 BAR mags were available and could have been modified for use in the rifle, he went with the en bloc clip instead for that reason.

    They are durable and quite accurate. Weight usually runs around 9 to 10 pounds, which is lighter than my Nat'l Match AR15 since I have lead weight in the buttstock to balance the rifle in the offhand stage.

    Rifles are available for sale through the CMP (www.odcmp.com). You need to belong to an CMP affiliated club. The TSRA qualifies. Other requirements are listed at their website.

    I didn't see where you're located, but if you're near Graham, I'd be glad to let you shoot my M1 sometime.
     
  3. treyw

    treyw Member

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    I traded my Garand off several years back, but it was always fun to shoot. The weight absorbs the majority of the recoil, and mine was always accurate. If I remember right it would consistently hold 1 to 1 1/2 in groups at 100 yds. I've been wanting another, but with the panic buying recently the prices they are going for are a little too high.
     
  4. Texas42

    Texas42 TGT Addict

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    I'm not an owner, but I've heard you have to be careful what powder you use in those rifles or you might damage it. Has something to do with the pressure curve that requires a very specific burn rate, even if the max pressure is well under the gun's specifications.

    I've heard of companies making M-1 specific 30-06 ammo, but haven't seen it myself.
     
  5. Big country

    Big country TGT Addict

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  6. Bullseye Shooter

    Bullseye Shooter Active Member

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    The first auction for the 5 mil serial number Garand is about right. The second auction is for a parts gun made with an aftermarket receiver, so I would not even consider that one. CMP is selling M1s for around $500 but some might need a new barrel or stock. They are the BEST source for a genuine M1. You might check out the CMP forum since there are a ton of guys on there who KNOW M1s and what to look for. CMP also sells new stocks for the M1.

    Texas42 is correct about some powders not being good for the M1 and also some commercial ammo is too hot for the op rod on the M1. The new Hornady manual has M1 specific loads. I've always used IMR 4895 which is an M1 specific powder. Hornady is also loading commercial ammo that is designed for the M1. That's what the CMP issued for the Garand match this year at Camp Perry.

    You also need to watch what bullet you shoot in the M1. It was designed around the original M1 Ball round which had a 173 grain bullet. Anything heavier can cause a problem unless you install an adjustable gas plug. I shoot either 145 or 168 grain bullets in mine and they both work fine.

    If you can find U.S. military ammo produced by Lake City or WCC, it will work in the M1 and not cause any pressure problems.
     
  7. landin18

    landin18 Member

    thanks for all the great info...now is there some particular makers i should steer away from or towards??
     
  8. Eli

    Eli Well-Known

    Steer away from non-GI ones. USGI are Springfield (original NOT Inc.), H&R, and Winchester. The Italian ones are Beretta and Breda. Any will give excellent service. Reese Surplus Inc. has new Berettas in 7.62 (.308) right now, but they're expensive.

    Eli
     
  9. Bullseye Shooter

    Bullseye Shooter Active Member

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    International Harvester also made M1s. They tend to bring a higher price because IH made the fewest number of them. Beware of anyone selling you an M1 who says all the parts match. Most M1s have gone through some kind of arsenal refurbishing where worn parts were changed out. Most op rods have been modified since the early ones had a design defect which was corrected. Also, most have had the "seventh round" mod done which allows you to load the rounds in the clip so it doesn't matter which side has the high round.

    Parts are easily identifiable since they will have a drawing number (not part number) on them. My Winchester has a bolt that is marked WRA but you might find one made by Springfield with a HRA bolt, etc. HRAs were built during the Korean War and sometimes have a mixture of parts.

    My M1 had all Winchester parts except the op rod which was made by Springfield. The barrel was even marked WRA.

    Springfield Armory, Inc (the guys who make M1As) also made M1s in the 1980s and 1990s. You could get them in .30-06, .308 and .243. They were very well made, some from GI parts and some from commercial castings.

    There are several good books out there on the M1. I have Canfield's book on collecting the M1 Garand and M1 Carbine. Lots of good info there.
     
  10. Eli

    Eli Well-Known

    Oops! I forgot about the tractor-guns! And I almost bought one a few months ago!

    Eli
     

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