Quick Tip on Improving Your Speed Reloads: You've Got To Do Them

SIG_Fiend

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TGT Supporter
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Feb 21, 2008
7,128
48
Austin, TX
There's more to it than that. Do you reload with the gun high, mid chest or low? How far do you rotate the gun? How do you grab the mag? True, doing reps will start to develop neural memory, and a person can start to go faster from it. To improve significantly, though, requires efficiency and minimizing wasteful movements. Tips I've learned that helped me quite a bit:



  • Learn to feel slide lock
    • You may not always be able to do this, but when you can, you can save some time. There is a discernible difference in feel when the slide locks open on the last round, as you do not feel the slide slamming back forward.
    • When this happens, you should practice towards developing the ability to simultaneously reach for your spare mag with your support hand while depressing the mag release. Keep the gun upright as you release the mag. If you rotate the gun before releasing the mag, it will often hang up or eject more slowly. Practice towards being able to have the spare mag in the air headed towards the gun at the moment the spent mag is falling out of it. This will take a lot of practice, and a majority of that practice can be done entirely dry, so it's free.
  • Drop the gun to mid chest
    • This may be subjective and entirely a matter of personal preference. For me at least, I've found that as I've released the spent mag and am bringing the new one to the gun, I tend to find the best and most consistent results as well as the best speed in dropping the gun a bit lower to more the mid chest to maybe even belly button level. Some people do the exact opposite, and keep the gun up very high in an exaggerated manner. I'm not entirely sure the reason why it works for myself and many others in keeping the gun lower, but I think it has something to do with the position and angles at play in terms of the wrist, forearms, elbows, etc. Up high seems to be a bit more of an extreme angle in certain places, whereas down a bit lower seems to be a bit more of hard and straight angles which are easier to replicate. Again, this may be simply a matter of individual physiology. What works for one may not be optimal for another. Bottom line, you'll have to experiment and see what works "best" for you. "Best" should not be judged subjectively, but rather objectively with a shot timer and based on consistency.
  • Full supination and partial ulnar deviation of the gun hand
    • Personally, I've found that with certain movements, minor differences can often make a huge difference in your performance and consistency
    • When rotating the gun towards the spare mag, you are supinating the wrist. Though, when most people do this, they often only supinate ~80-90deg. This puts the magwell completely perpendicular to your line of sight, making it difficult to "look" the mag into the magwell. In a similar manner to maximizing full range of motion for an excellent bicep curl, try to go just a bit past 90deg supinated. This will allow you to see the inside edge of the mag well, making it a bit easier to gauge distance and orientation.
    • A small golden nugget I've found, which helped me quite a bit, was also introducing a very small amount of ulnar deviation along with this. In effect, you are rotating the gun ~90-100deg. You also cant the bottom of your hand inboard just a few degrees, like maybe 5-10deg. In effect, you are helping better line up the mag with the magwell. In a perfect world, this would mean the path from the mag pouch to the magwell, as determined by your unique physiology and arm movements, would be as close to what amounts to a straight line for you.


TL;DR Version
Because I know most won't bother reading any of that. LOL


  • Learn to feel the beginning stimulus of the process (slide lock), and build a quicker reaction
  • Learn to use angles to your advantage
  • Push yourself on the shot timer and maintain accountability
  • Most of this can be done dry for free. Check it live at some point.


Reference for the scientific terminology:

http://www.ergovancouver.net/wrist_movements.htm
 

txinvestigator

TGT Addict
May 28, 2008
14,119
113
Ft Worth, TX
It is a parody thing... Like The Onion!

Shake and jiggle, and take the gun out of the plane of aim. Good stuff

And that dumb ass turning the body after you shoot, muzzle everything. haahaahaahaahaahaa
 

Mreed911

TGT Addict
BANNED!!!
Apr 18, 2013
7,339
36
Austin, TX
Wow. I didn't know you could combine shooting and breakdancing.

At the matches I shoot, that's a guaranteed DQ.

Given that you've completely ignored what's around you up til then, why the "look around?" Do you actually know what you're doing or did you see it somewhere and it became a routine for you?
 
May 24, 2015
82
16
There's more to it than that. Do you reload with the gun high, mid chest or low? How far do you rotate the gun? How do you grab the mag? True, doing reps will start to develop neural memory, and a person can start to go faster from it. To improve significantly, though, requires efficiency and minimizing wasteful movements. Tips I've learned that helped me quite a bit:



  • Learn to feel slide lock
    • You may not always be able to do this, but when you can, you can save some time. There is a discernible difference in feel when the slide locks open on the last round, as you do not feel the slide slamming back forward.
    • When this happens, you should practice towards developing the ability to simultaneously reach for your spare mag with your support hand while depressing the mag release. Keep the gun upright as you release the mag. If you rotate the gun before releasing the mag, it will often hang up or eject more slowly. Practice towards being able to have the spare mag in the air headed towards the gun at the moment the spent mag is falling out of it. This will take a lot of practice, and a majority of that practice can be done entirely dry, so it's free.
  • Drop the gun to mid chest
    • This may be subjective and entirely a matter of personal preference. For me at least, I've found that as I've released the spent mag and am bringing the new one to the gun, I tend to find the best and most consistent results as well as the best speed in dropping the gun a bit lower to more the mid chest to maybe even belly button level. Some people do the exact opposite, and keep the gun up very high in an exaggerated manner. I'm not entirely sure the reason why it works for myself and many others in keeping the gun lower, but I think it has something to do with the position and angles at play in terms of the wrist, forearms, elbows, etc. Up high seems to be a bit more of an extreme angle in certain places, whereas down a bit lower seems to be a bit more of hard and straight angles which are easier to replicate. Again, this may be simply a matter of individual physiology. What works for one may not be optimal for another. Bottom line, you'll have to experiment and see what works "best" for you. "Best" should not be judged subjectively, but rather objectively with a shot timer and based on consistency.
  • Full supination and partial ulnar deviation of the gun hand
    • Personally, I've found that with certain movements, minor differences can often make a huge difference in your performance and consistency
    • When rotating the gun towards the spare mag, you are supinating the wrist. Though, when most people do this, they often only supinate ~80-90deg. This puts the magwell completely perpendicular to your line of sight, making it difficult to "look" the mag into the magwell. In a similar manner to maximizing full range of motion for an excellent bicep curl, try to go just a bit past 90deg supinated. This will allow you to see the inside edge of the mag well, making it a bit easier to gauge distance and orientation.
    • A small golden nugget I've found, which helped me quite a bit, was also introducing a very small amount of ulnar deviation along with this. In effect, you are rotating the gun ~90-100deg. You also cant the bottom of your hand inboard just a few degrees, like maybe 5-10deg. In effect, you are helping better line up the mag with the magwell. In a perfect world, this would mean the path from the mag pouch to the magwell, as determined by your unique physiology and arm movements, would be as close to what amounts to a straight line for you.


TL;DR Version
Because I know most won't bother reading any of that. LOL


  • Learn to feel the beginning stimulus of the process (slide lock), and build a quicker reaction
  • Learn to use angles to your advantage
  • Push yourself on the shot timer and maintain accountability
  • Most of this can be done dry for free. Check it live at some point.


Reference for the scientific terminology:

http://www.ergovancouver.net/wrist_movements.htm
Sig,

Awesome information here. I really appreciate you taking the time (and a lot of it) to add so much value to this post. I like where you heads at on some of the topics, and am going to really focus on making some training changes during my next session.
 
May 24, 2015
82
16
I actually really appreciate the criticism, even if it may appear to others as coming off harsh. I'm looking to improve my skills, and getting an outside perspective is some of the best way to use technology, to achieve this. Plus, with the amount of shooters in the Great State, it looks like I'm going to get a lot of it. Thanks for everyone who took the time to critique, or comment on this thread.
 

Mreed911

TGT Addict
BANNED!!!
Apr 18, 2013
7,339
36
Austin, TX
I'm glad you're doing it - the only way to learn. 200 more and you're on the road to being natural, fluid, and Hickock46. :)
 
May 24, 2015
82
16
I'm glad you're doing it - the only way to learn. 200 more and you're on the road to being natural, fluid, and Hickock46. :)
HA. I'll be a far cry from The Great Hickok45, but I appreciate the comment. I've found that the best way for me to improve, is to put videos online, and have individuals comment on it. Their critiques have helped me along the way to identify major faults in my own training...things I wouldn't be able to identify alone. It's been a great experience, and I'm glad to have the people that are in this forum taking the time to point out areas that I need improvement with.
 

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