reloading the s&w 40

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by country_boy, Dec 24, 2009.

  1. country_boy

    country_boy TGT Addict

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    I need some information on die selection. I always buy the LEE carbide dies for pistol with the factory crimp die. I was reading in my Lyman book not to over crimp due to head space. Would it be ok to use the factory crimp die, or is it important to use a taper crimp die(if they make one??) What do yall do for this round?
     


  2. wshbrngr

    wshbrngr Member

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    Factory crimp die would probably be better, however,
    I have been loading for my Beretta 96 Brigadier and just use the Hornady .40 S&W dieset and apply a light roll crimp with the seating die.

    I do just enough crimp to hold the bullet firmly.

    Several hundred rounds later, no problems.

    (I do the same with 9mm and 45acp)
     
  3. Rifleman55

    Rifleman55 Member

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    A taper crimp die is the best, I load 45 and 9mm and use a Dillon SDB which uses a taper crimp, use just enough to bring the belled case back to or just a small amount into the bullet. Remember that autopistols headspace on the case mouth.
     
  4. captain-03

    captain-03 New Member

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    I, too, use the tamper crimp die ... not just with the 40S&W, but with the 9mm and 45acp. I have found that the Lee factory crimp die gives me some bad ammo every now and then ... a few rounds do not seem to want to go into full battery in my Glock 22. The tamper die solved the problem.
     
  5. oldguy

    oldguy Well-Known

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    I use the Lee factory crimp die on 9, 40 and 45acp with excellent results, I prefer to seat and crimp two different operations I find I get a more consistent OAL in that manner. Big issue with the 40 watch out for set back, (allowing bullet to push back into case when chambered), an issue on all calibers but IMO especially the 40cal.
     
  6. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Active Member

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    Always apply a taper crimp or "factory crimp" in a different step from bullet seating. I use taper crimp dies for all pistol rounds I load for (.32 ACP, .380 ACP, 9 X 19, .38 Super, .357 Sig, .40, 10mm and .45 ACP). I crimp enough to make a visible mark on the mouth of the case.
     
  7. Texas42

    Texas42 TGT Addict

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    I'm not going to act like I'm a super reloader guru, but I don't think much, if any crimp is really needed on these auto pistol rounds. Used to add a medium or light crimp on my 9mm luger, but really couldn't tell a darn pit of difference (really light loads). So why waste the brass?
     
  8. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Active Member

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    Depending on the gun a light to moderate taper crimp will prevent bullet set back on chambering. Some crimp helps to ensure proper and consistant ignition and can enhance accuracy. My taper crimps are moderate, just enough to see. If nothing else it reverses the belling of the mouth that is very detrimental to good feeding in a tight chamber.
     
  9. country_boy

    country_boy TGT Addict

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    So what your saying robo is that a factory crimp die will be ok on the 40 s & w? I use the factory crimp die separately on my other pistol rounds as well but, this is the first time reloading this round. Any other recommendations?
     
  10. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Active Member

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    With any cartridge that headspaces on the mouth of the case, crimps must be carefully applied. A roll crimp commonly used on revolvers is NOT good in these cartridges. It displaces too much material and buggers up the headspace.

    A taper crimp can be over applied as can a "factory crimp". Use either, just do it judiciously. Heavy roll crimps are needed in some revolver loads especially Magnums for two reasons. One, to insure positive ignition. Slow burning powders like H-110 and W-296 take a little bit to get going. The nature of the revolver is there is little resistance to forward movement of the bullet until it hits the rifling. This can be quite a distance. If the powder is not fully ignited before that point, some kernals will not burn and you will lose too much pressure through the barrel/cylinder gap. The second reason is in heavy recoiling Magnums (or heavy bullets in light revolvers) can cause the bullet to move forward out of the case and possibly jam up the action by protruding out the front of the cylinder. A firm roll crimp keeps this from happening.
     

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