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Shivworks Edged Weapons Overview (EWO) Recoil article

Discussion in 'Articles & How-Tos' started by Combative Weapon Solution, Aug 27, 2014.

  1. Combative Weapon Solution

    Combative Weapon Solution <b>Forum Sponsor</b>

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    Feb 14, 2013
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    Here is a another article by Combative Weapon Solutions CEO/Owner Lee Vernon for Recoil. As a company, we feel it is imperative to continue our training as students which makes us better teachers for our clients. That and Craig Douglas is a great guy that I consider a friend in the defense industry. If you have not taken a class from Shivworks, then do yourself a favor and GO! It is a humbling experience that will open your eyes to the realities of personal defense.

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    Shivworks EWO Class Review - RECOIL

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    Tactical Weapon Training Classes Austin Texas
     


  2. Reinz

    Reinz Active Member

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    I can't believe it, only 9 views in a month and everybody on this forum carries a knife! And mostly tacticle knives from what I have seen and read from the posts.

    I plan on putting this course on my list for 2015.

    Thanks for posting a great article!
     
  3. HBadger

    HBadger Member

    I've had knife training over the years during my career and am very comfortable with a blade- I currently always have my Spartan Breed fighter or little Fallkniven G1 with me- but even though I practice with people and groups- I'll take all the training I can get as there is always going to be someone who is as good if not better than I, so train, train, train. I hear Shivworks has some pretty good courses. If you carry a tactical or fighting knife and have never taken a class- it's like having a gun and thinking you are cool for any SD situation after only taking your basic CHL class- It's worth the money to take a class to know your knife and it's capabilities/shortcomings intimately if you ever think you might use it.
     
  4. Combative Weapon Solution

    Combative Weapon Solution <b>Forum Sponsor</b>

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    Feb 14, 2013
    Austin, TX
    That class is a game changer, as is all of Craig's classes. Unfortunately, a lot of people do not like to find out that everything they "think" they know is wrong or is not going to cut it, literally. Violent confrontations are just that, fast, chaotic, and if you are truly not rounded in your skills, you will have your ass handed to you very quickly. You get worked in the class, but in the end, you find out what really works and just how much stuff being taught out there is garbage or Hollywood Youtube that will end up getting you hurt or killed. Real life events are not a game.
     
  5. HBadger

    HBadger Member

    Yeah... I thought I was a badass with my martial arts belt and all the rough arrests and scuffles I was in before I jumped to the Federal agency I recently retired from- back when I signed on Federal, all our firearms / CQB and hand to hand was taught by Mil guys like Delta Force and other elements of similar skill level - we worked in a lot a lot of overseas hostile countries / foreign wars/ civil wars, and we worked a lot with the Military conducting evacuations and such, so much of our training was conducted by Military or joint with Military- and no I was not in an investigative branch of the Military.
    Point being, never underestimate anyone or situation- I had my ass handed to me by an instructor- a little tiny guy that I was expecting to force a tap out or make pass out in short order- it didn't quite work out that way... I had no idea that you could be in the air horizontally and receive a precise nut shot followed by coming down face-first with a boot in my neck and MY weapon (taken) pushed into the side of my head.
    If they give the kind of classes and eye-opening experience like you mention, it is good for those who are in the physical health and can afford it to see what a "real" confrontations can entail, how quickly things can go sideways, and even though you get your ass handed to you, I've often learned the most thru mistakes or failures on my part that later became teaching points when I later conducted training for foreign police and SF at ILEA in Thailand. Setting people up for failure now and then can be very educational and humbling. The new agents I hear are now also going thru SERE school- a "camping trip" that we did not have the pleasure of attending back when I came on, but the training cadre took us on a 2 day "experience" that was basically their version of "SERE school" as many of the things we did / were done to us are what they teach in SERE. Of course you can't hand people their asses all day long every day(well... you can, however...), but mixed in with a healthy dose of some positive training experiences, setting students up for failure often forces one to think "outside the box", and that's where I want a student's mindset to be.
     

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