Smoothing Sharp Edges

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by Fisherman777, Dec 11, 2009.

  1. Fisherman777

    Fisherman777 Well-Known

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    Jan 15, 2009
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    Hey there fellas!

    I have a new Springfield GI 1911 Parkerized (about 100 rounds through it) and a Tucker Silent Thunder IWB holster. The holster is leather lined kydex. I like it but the gun as you know has sharp edges all over the thing and drawing and reholstering is going to just tear up this holster before it's time.

    What would you do? Have all of the shart edges buffed and refinish the gun or sell/trade it for a 1911 without the shart edges? I love the gun. It's a great shooter and very accurate.

    I would like to have a beavertail safety and maybe a differrent hammer too.

    What would all of that cost approximately?
     


  2. res1b3uq

    res1b3uq Active Member

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    Cheapest way--but another holster when that one gets ragged.
     
  3. 87'vette

    87'vette Member

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    Sounds like a plan to me. :mad0079:
     
  4. Texas1911

    Texas1911 TGT Addict

    May 29, 2017
    Austin, TX
    You can have a "melt" treatment done to the gun that will round the sharp edges.

    I would just replace the holster as mentioned above.
     
  5. Fisherman777

    Fisherman777 Well-Known

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    What's a melt treatment involve and approx what does it cost?

    I'd still like to replace the safety and hammer for comfort though. Is there a source for those that isn't too expensive?
     
  6. res1b3uq

    res1b3uq Active Member

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    Brownells can provide you with the parts, and you can even find instructions on their website for doing that little job yourself. The safety and the hammer are probably the most expensive small parts on the pistol.
     
  7. BT1911

    BT1911 Member

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    It's commonly known as "dehorning". It involves breaking/rounding all sharp edges and polishing. Runs between $150 - $250 as it also will require a refinish. The wear on yours is likely coming from the sharp lower part of the slide which SA is famous for.

    Clarks has an extreme meltdown package.

    If you're going to fit a BT safety, you're going to have to go with the .220 radius. You're also going to have to get the .220 S&A radius jig to match the contour unless you want the thing to look like your 7 year old niece worked on it. The hammer is an easy swap --- if you have the BT safety installed. If not, your options are thin since a skeleton / match hammer won't fit since it will bottom out on the standard grip safety before it's fully cocked. An option is to go with the WWII style spur hammer. I personally wouldn't swap a hammer without swapping the sear to match. Or you could just look for a reputable smith to do everything. Google can help you with pricing.
     
  8. Fisherman777

    Fisherman777 Well-Known

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    Wow! Those prices make me want to leave the gun as is. "Say! That's a pretty sharp gun you have there!" LOL

    In 1980 I bought an old Argentine 1911A1 with a hammer like that. I dropped in a new Colt match grade barrell and bushing in it because the old barrell's rifling was shot out and smooth. My buddy still has it. Says he tricked it out with various options and refinished it. I'd sure like to see that old thing but he lives in Florida and the gun is in Oklahoma.

    I like $20 better than a gazillion! Maybe I could sell this one and upgrade to something else someday soon. I like Springfield (this one's a great shooter) but are all of their slides sharp like that?
     
  9. BT1911

    BT1911 Member

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    Just like any other mfr, the devil (and $$$) is in the details. I have 3 SA's that all started out as mil-specs and were upgraded. Most mil-specs and GI model slides I've seen are cutters; more so than Colt, Kimber, etc. The higher end models like the TRP and loaded versions don't have those same features.

    The bottom of the slide where the rough machine marks might be shouldn't be touching the holster. If this thing is really slicing it up as opposed to marking it, there's something very wrong.
     
  10. Fisherman777

    Fisherman777 Well-Known

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    Well, not exactly slicing it up but I thought that if the sharp edges at the front were smoothed, it would be easier to re-holster. The sharp edges at the front of the slide sort of cut into the holster as well.
     

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