Snap Cap Question.

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  • okie556

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    Feb 12, 2009
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    Have owned guns all my life and never had a need for Snap Caps. I recently purchased a Sig P938 and I love everything about the gun except the trigger pull. Was suggested that I buy some snap caps and dry fire A LOT and maybe that will help. Could I just use a empty 9mm case or is snap cap a must. Also, do you think dry firing a few hundred times will really help or should I just take it to a gunsmith?
     

    The Dave

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    you can make snap caps by using a nail to tap out the fired cap from a used case and then fill the primer well with something like a small bit of pencil eraser or silicone. The idea is that you are giving the firing pin something to hit and slow down before it reaches its full length of travel and it slams into the housing. I thought it mainly applied to rimfire firearms, but then I had a H&R handi-rifle snap the pin from dry firing now I pull the hammer back and either use a snap cap or just ease the hammer home.
     

    navyguy

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    Better yet. Forget about snap caps on hammer fired pistols. Just put a foam earplug (or a small piece if it won't fit) wedged in front of the hammer. Better then snap caps, as there is zero energy transfer to the firing pin. Some people put a small rubber O-ring in there and that works pretty good too.

    Let me know if you don't know what I'm talking about and I'll post a picture.
     

    Bozz10mm

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    Dry firing several hundred times might smooth the trigger pull some, but, I bet it's not going to reduce the actual pull weight by much at all. Have you tested the pull weight with a trigger scale? A trigger scale is a very useful tool. If you do end up taking the pistol to a gunsmith, you will know exactly how much the pull was reduced.
     
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    okie556

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    Foam ear plug or o'ring both good ideas but as suggested, I think I will also have the trigger pull tested. I'm not sure what 7.5-8.5 pounds feels like but I'm betting mine is more than 8.5. Could be my imagination but seemed like the first mag or two it was better then got worse. It's brand new and I guess it could have gotten a small burr or something in it. I'll report back what I find out is the problem.
     

    navyguy

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    My P238 measures in at about 8 lbs. I have a cheap-o spring gauge that I'm thinking is + - 1/2 - 1/4 lb or so. I don't think trigger pull will be reduced by much from dry fire (or shooting) but will make the shooter accustom to the trigger, and that's the real point of dry fire. I'm very happy with what I can do with my 8 lb trigger which I need to pull on the second joint and not finger pad. Not near what I can shoot with a nice SA 1911 or my Sig P228, but acceptable for what the gun is designed for. It is of course a CQ defense pistol, not a target shooter.
     

    TheDan

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    The P938's stock trigger pull is pretty damn heavy. With a little tweaking on the spring I got both of mine to around 6.5lbs. I didn't want to do too much as I do carry it... Internally it's pretty similar to a 1911, so you can use any 1911 guide out there on adjusting the spring tension. Dry firing it 1000 times will smooth it out some, but it's not going to do much for the weight of the pull.
     

    okie556

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    My P238 measures in at about 8 lbs. I have a cheap-o spring gauge that I'm thinking is + - 1/2 - 1/4 lb or so. I don't think trigger pull will be reduced by much from dry fire (or shooting) but will make the shooter accustom to the trigger, and that's the real point of dry fire. I'm very happy with what I can do with my 8 lb trigger which I need to pull on the second joint and not finger pad. Not near what I can shoot with a nice SA 1911 or my Sig P228, but acceptable for what the gun is designed for. It is of course a CQ defense pistol, not a target shooter.
    I'm curious to see what my pull is. I am used to shooting my Springfield EMP and S & W E-Series so I may need to adjust finger placement on trigger as well.
     

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