Snubbie .38 vs .380?

Discussion in 'Handguns' started by cb51, Nov 16, 2017.

  1. grasshopperglock

    grasshopperglock Error F2

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    Stopping the threat is step number 2. What you use to do it and in what order is irrelevant. Staying alive is number 1. We'd all like to assume the perfect tool for the job will be at hand. Best advice...

    Shoot them in the face.
     


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  2. Younggun

    Younggun Doer of Deeds TGT Supporter Admin

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    With a rifle.

    If you don't have the proper tool you've already failed at #1, which is having the proper tool to stay alive.
     
  3. seeker_two

    seeker_two Well-Known

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    Most SD situations will start and end with you using whatever you have on your person at the time. Unless you're going for the "Fatty & Snowboots" look on a daily basis, then you're fighting the fight with your pistol.

    Train accordingly.....

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
     
  4. cb51

    cb51 Member

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    Okay for you rifle people; how do you tote a rifle around in todays modern urbanized landscape? Going to stop and pick up the dry cleaning? Stopping off to pick up a pizza on the way home? Dropping the car off for an oil change? Going to the dentist for the cleaning and exam? Going out to dinner with the better half?

    You going to carry that rifle all the time? Yeah, right. The fact is, in modern American, whatever small handgun is concealed on you, is the tool that is going to be used to stop the threat, no matter if it's a car jacking, mugging, or just an assault by some lowlife. Just like Bernard Goetz and George Zimmerman, the gun in your pocket is the one that will be used. The rifle is a range toy or hunting tool. It does no good in the car trunk or pickup, but that compact 9mm or .380 or .38 special will be there. And it will be all over in a few seconds and a few shots at pretty close range. If you need a rifle, you haven't practiced enough with the handgun.
     
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  5. skfullen

    skfullen In the woods... TGT Supporter

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    Well said. It is a matter of practicality and reality. Otherwise, we would each have a personal security detail armed with rifles.

    And honestly, in a situation where proximity, or even physical contact (ie a struggle) is involved, a handgun may be an advantage. Do you keep a "LongTom" shotgun or a "Riot" shotgum by your bedroom? Why?
     
  6. cb51

    cb51 Member

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    The fact that is very much true, about 50% of the street confrontation/assaults result in personal contact. Even when it doesn't, the range is so close that by the time you reach out pointing the gun the muzzle is only a few feet from the target. A struggle is very common in street muggings with the range being 'in your face.'

    I've only been down here in Texas for two years now, but I spent most my life in and around Washington D.C. and grew up in a lower class neighborhood. Inner city. Violence was common, and people carried weapons, law or not. Usually a pocket size pistol of some sort. The criminals practice was to be walking the other way and suddenly step right over into your path with a knife or gun shoved against you and demand your wallet. So it was common practice to keep your gun in a pocket where you could slide a hand right into the pocket and have the gun right inland if things looked like it was going to happen. Situational awareness was important, and you kept track of people seeming to approach to close in a suspicious manner. After a while you got to recognize the behavior and took evasive action as a first step, with your hand on your gun in the pocket. A little .32, .380, .38, or even a Raven .25. They worked and had a good street rep.

    Point is, things happened very close. Now from what I've seen when we go down in Austin, it's very similar. This BS about fighting your way to the rifle is pure hype to sell more rifles. By the time you fight your way to the rifle, it's all over but the funeral arrangements for someone. The criminal is to going to let you walk away once they've sized you up as their next meal ticket or drug money score. Whatever you carry is going to have to be used to put them down. If you can fit an AR in your pants pockets, so be it.
     
  7. Younggun

    Younggun Doer of Deeds TGT Supporter Admin

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    I'all take the experience I gained in Kekistan over the word of internet warriors.
     
  8. Jon Payne

    Jon Payne Well-Known

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    I’ve always considered the Colt Agent equipped with a Colt hammer shroud and Tyler T-Grip adapter to be the apex of snubby revolver development. The 642-1 from the S&W Performance Center may come in as a tie though.


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  9. Jon Payne

    Jon Payne Well-Known

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    f402383d4fae999e345555f85bb66bba.jpg

    This came from the High Power & Handguns website. It shows the graceful lines of the Colt Agent.


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  10. Jon Payne

    Jon Payne Well-Known

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    57b55cf03dbcb4d4772f587b09273113.jpg

    This is my 642-1. The only change I’ve made is adding VZ grips.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     


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