Soldier on trial

majormadmax

Úlfhéðnar
Aug 27, 2009
13,433
113
San Antonio!
Grisham-2-Trial-Belton-10.15.13.jpg


He's wearing his uniform at a rally, clearly in violation of Army regulation 670-1 Ch. 1-10.j.

Wearing Army uniforms is prohibited in the following situations:
(1) In connection with the furtherance of any political or commercial interests, or when engaged in off-duty civilian employment.
(2) When participating in public speeches, interviews, picket lines, marches, rallies, or public demonstrations, except as authorized by competent authority.
(3) When attending any meeting or event that is a function of, or is sponsored by, an extremist organization.
(4) When wearing the uniform would bring discredit upon the Army.
(5) When specifically prohibited by Army regulations.
Quite telling...

And he is not on trial as a soldier, this has nothing to do with his military service. He was charged as a private citizen during an off-duty incident and should not be exploiting his service to support his case.
 

PhulesAu

TGT Addict
Jul 26, 2013
3,082
113
Texas, Mostly
I'm not sure what I think of dragging the army into this. BUT I'd like to see one of the Medal Of Honor recipients Tell the obasturd off! but after what they have gone through, to be nominated. I'm in no position to tell one of them how to act.
 

shooterfpga

TGT Addict
Jul 24, 2011
4,431
48
Conroe, TX
Grisham-2-Trial-Belton-10.15.13.jpg


He's wearing his uniform at a rally, clearly in violation of Army regulation 670-1 Ch. 1-10.j.



Quite telling...

And he is not on trial as a soldier, this has nothing to do with his military service. He was charged as a private citizen during an off-duty incident and should not be exploiting his service to support his case.
I dont believe it matters whether its a military court or civilian as to whether he should wear his uniform. Lawyers will tell you to play to the jury and those of the court by looking professional. What is more professional than our dress uniform? Yeah, it may not be in good taste and possibly bring ucmj charges later. But im pretty sure id rather take ucmj than a bs civilian charge. And because of his most likely great conduct he probably wont see anything but an njp if anything at all unless higher up is politically motivated and wants to make an example.

Its an injustice that this soldier gets harrassed but not too many months ago, a random guy in galveston waving a come and take it flag with an ar15 strapped to his back on a busy weekend right on the beach walked up and down for hours unmolested. Hmmm.....we follow a set of standards and uniformity, if they arent going to follow a standard they shouldnt try to enforce one that isnt even illegal.
 

majormadmax

Úlfhéðnar
Aug 27, 2009
13,433
113
San Antonio!
It's not a BS civilian charge. No matter what the circumstances, peace officers in Texas have the right to disarm anyone during contact. He refused to hand over his weapon and was charged for it. This guy is a known instigator (he has a long track record of it in the military) and he knew what he was doing was wrong but "wanted to make a point." I am not talking about the OC, but how he reacted to the police. Play stupid games, win stupid prizes!
 

Shotgun Jeremy

Spelling Bee Champeon
Lifetime Member
Jul 8, 2012
11,222
113
Central Texas
I believe that only applies to chl carriers and their pistols. I've seen several of these videos where officers ask the guys to take off their rifles and the guys refuse to unless they are being apprehended. Then the discussion moves on to other things.
 

majormadmax

Úlfhéðnar
Aug 27, 2009
13,433
113
San Antonio!
If a peace officer reasonably believes a safety risk exists, the officer may disarm anyone. It doesn't only apply to CHL holders (although Grisham has a CHL and was carrying a concealed .45, so GC §411.207 would apply)...
 
Last edited:

Shotgun Jeremy

Spelling Bee Champeon
Lifetime Member
Jul 8, 2012
11,222
113
Central Texas
Yea, i forgot about that part.
 
Top Bottom