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  • Texas1911

    TGT Addict
    Rating - 100%
    1   0   0
    May 29, 2017
    10,594
    31
    Austin, TX
    Had a guy come in today with his kids asking for some ammo for his old revolver his grandfather gave him. He said it was a .32 so I asked to see it so we could verify. Sure enough it was a .32 WCF which is a right old cartridge.

    Upon closer inspection his "old revolver" turned out to be a 1890s model Colt single action Army ... and it's approx. value according to our appraisal book was about $8,000 - $12,000. When I saw it said Colt, and it was a Single Action I immediately told him not to ever shoot it again. He didn't seem so adamant about taking that advice until he saw what it was worth. He then chucked aside all intentions to shoot it and went straight, presumably, to McBride's where we told him to have it appraised for insurance value.

    The gun had 8 notches cut into the extractor tube, which is Texan for bodies of some sort, so the gun had some heritage to it being a factory heirloom.

    I also told him and his kids to never sell it.
     

    baboon

    TGT Addict
    Rating - 100%
    3   0   0
    May 6, 2008
    16,687
    96
    Out here by the lake!
    I'm waiting on a 50 year old Colt Python with a 2.5 inch barrel that's new in the box. Not a find like the one you handled, but it will be mine to do as I see fit.
     

    jfrey

    Active Member
    Rating - 0%
    0   0   0
    Apr 8, 2008
    419
    1
    Coastal Texas
    My best friend inherited a 1873 Colt SAA in 38/40. It has real ivory grips and he has the original holster it was carried in. He also has a Winchester 1892 rifle in the same caliber that matches the revolver. Both are in good condition and YES, we did take them out and shoot them both. His son is the 5th generation to shoot these guns. Shooting these old guns is expensive but the fun is worth it.
     

    Hoji

    Bowling-Pin Commando
    Rating - 100%
    32   0   0
    May 28, 2008
    15,015
    96
    Mustang Ridge
    Hope he writes to Colt for documentation, it could raise the value quite a bit.
     

    Hoji

    Bowling-Pin Commando
    Rating - 100%
    32   0   0
    May 28, 2008
    15,015
    96
    Mustang Ridge
    Had a guy come in today with his kids asking for some ammo for his old revolver his grandfather gave him. He said it was a .32 so I asked to see it so we could verify. Sure enough it was a .32 WCF which is a right old cartridge.

    Upon closer inspection his "old revolver" turned out to be a 1890s model Colt single action Army ... and it's approx. value according to our appraisal book was about $8,000 - $12,000. When I saw it said Colt, and it was a Single Action I immediately told him not to ever shoot it again. He didn't seem so adamant about taking that advice until he saw what it was worth. He then chucked aside all intentions to shoot it and went straight, presumably, to McBride's where we told him to have it appraised for insurance value.

    The gun had 8 notches cut into the extractor tube, which is Texan for bodies of some sort, so the gun had some heritage to it being a factory heirloom.

    I also told him and his kids to never sell it.


    To bad his offspring are probably government educated and will call a hotline and report their dad for having an illegal gun, only to have it "lost" before his case clears and it can be returned.
     

    Pawdog

    Member
    Rating - 0%
    0   0   0
    Jun 21, 2008
    91
    11
    Lake Kimble, Texas
    I am in line (hopefully) to inherit a flintlock that was carried by my ancestors in the Civil War.


    Flintlock? Are you sure it's not a percussion cap? Most used during the war and a few years before it were either percussion cap or early rimfire rifles.
     

    jwise

    New Member
    Rating - 0%
    0   0   0
    Jun 17, 2009
    43
    1
    Spring
    You know, as I wrote that I thought to myself that flintlock was probably wrong. I don't ACTUALLY know, as I have not handled it, and only seen very bad pictures of it. It is probably a percussion cap rifle.
     
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