Sporterized 1917 "Eddystone" rifle

Blind Sniper

Well-Known
Apr 12, 2013
1,831
36
Bay City, MI
Dad bought a sporterized 1917 "American Enfield" (I think that's the right name) for $350 over the weekend, and lo and behold, I'm stuck trying to figure out if he got ripped off.

From what I can tell, the rifle is 65% or better. The sights have been removed and the receiver drilled/tapped for a scope mount, and the original stock/furniture has been replaced with a Bishop sporter stock (which apparently goes for $175 new and unfinished on the Macon Gunstocks website). Finish is worn in quite a few spots, but there's literally no rust on the rifle whatsoever.

Plain and simple, did I inadvertently **** my dad over by telling him to go ahead on the buy without seeing the gun? If so, how badly? And if not, how good of a deal did he get?
 

Moonpie

Omnipotent Potentate for hire.
Lifetime Member
Oct 4, 2013
15,568
113
Gunz are icky.
It's hard to say.
Sported military rifles can be done well and then not so much.
A well done Sporter '17 is worth about what you paid.
If your Pop likes the gun and it shoots well, call it good and be happy.
They're good, solid, heavy duty rifles and will last generations.
About the only weakness they have is the ejector spring. It is known to break. Easily replaced.
 

Army 1911

TGT Addict
Mar 17, 2008
3,722
113
Dallas Texas or so
Look up the history of the 1917 enfield. It was more common than the 03 springer in wwI, IIRC. The rear sights had big ears protecting them. Operational note: it cocks on closing -- not opening. This allows you to store it without dry firing it. Simply hold the trigger while closing the bolt.

Once upon a time I had a star gauged one. extremely accurate...National Match accurate. Most of them were made by Remmington I think. Eddystone was a federal arsenal that made quite a few of them. I think I paid around $50 for mine in the 1960s at Hodgdons in Shawnee Kansas.
 

Bulldog7906

Member
May 24, 2014
96
16
San Antonio
I brother had two sporterized ones. One in 30-06 and another chambered in 7mm. I wish I had one in original form. I see a lot of 303s around never a 1917 Endlfield "Dough Boy"

"Greater love has no one than this, than to lay down one’s life for his friends." John 15:13 NKJV
 

Moonpie

Omnipotent Potentate for hire.
Lifetime Member
Oct 4, 2013
15,568
113
Gunz are icky.
The 1917 U.S. Enfield rifle was a war time modification of the British Pattern 1914 rifle.
The Brits, recognizing the superiority of the Mauser type action, wanted to switch over from the Lee-Enfield type action and designed the Pattern 1913 rifle. The P-13 was originally chambered in a then new .276 Enfield caliber. Ballistically very similar to our present day 7mm-08.
Along came WW1 and they went to war with what they had(No.1 MkIII) in .303. The P-13 was re-designed to chamber the .303 Brit. and renamed the Pattern 1914.
With British industry fully dedicated to war production of the No.1 rifle, the new P-14 rifle was contracted to Winchester, Remington,and Eddystone for production.
Eddystone was a subsidiary of Remington.
When the U.S. entered WW1 the rifle was again re-designed for the U.S. .30-06 cartridge and renamed the Model 1917 U.S. Enfield.
By wars end the M1917 had surpassed the Springfield 1903 in numbers produced and actual combat use.
Production ended at the end of the war.
After the war the M1903 was chosen as the standard U.S. military rifle and the M1917 went surplus and was phased out.
Some very limited use occurred during WW2, mostly stateside guard duty,etc.
Eddystone are the most common, followed by Remington,then Winchester. The collector types get all wet over Winchesters but they are NOT a better rifle. They are all "mil-spec".
The Eddystone rifles are known to crack receivers when Bubba tries to change barrels. Check carefully when considering buying if one has an aftermarket barrel(like many sporters do). If its the original military barrel you should be good to go. Check the barrel date up by the front sight. If original it will be 1917 or 1918. There are WW2 dated barrels too.
A lot of the 1917 actions were/are used by custom gunsmiths to make large, heavy caliber custom rifles due to the strength of the actions.
Parts are available to convert to cock on opening but it isn't really needed.
 

Jeffrey

Active Member
BANNED!!!
Jan 12, 2013
495
16
Longview, Tx
First, PICTURES!!!!

Second, I'm going to be the daisy here, and question the idea that the mouser is a better action than the Enfield.
 

Bulldog7906

Member
May 24, 2014
96
16
San Antonio
There are pictures of troops on Normandy carrying the 1917

"Greater love has no one than this, than to lay down one’s life for his friends." John 15:13 NKJV
 
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