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  • legaltrip

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    May 29, 2014
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    anybody ever coat their bullets with this stuff? if so, how does it shoot?
     

    Texasjack

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    Jan 3, 2010
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    It's a lubricant, much like the molybdenum disulfide that was so popular a few years ago.

    What people found with "moly" was that it did reduce bore friction, but that often reduced velocity as well. Powders are designed to for the "standard" friction a bullet would encounter. With less friction, the pressure may not reach maximum before the bullet gets out of the barrel. It seems backwards - like less friction should make the bullets go faster - but reality is somewhat different.
     

    franzas

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    Mar 3, 2014
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    It's a lubricant, much like the molybdenum disulfide that was so popular a few years ago.

    What people found with "moly" was that it did reduce bore friction, but that often reduced velocity as well. Powders are designed to for the "standard" friction a bullet would encounter. With less friction, the pressure may not reach maximum before the bullet gets out of the barrel. It seems backwards - like less friction should make the bullets go faster - but reality is somewhat different.

    Not necessarily. A little friction is a good thing. The bullet expands and "grips" the rifling to increase velocity down the barrel. When shooting lead, you want .001-.003" larger than your bore to enhance this effect. Think of running 9mm in moon clips through a .38; less friction, but less velocity and accuracy.

    A more physical example:
    Think about driving on ice. You have way less friction between your tires and the road, but you're getting hardly anywhere while your engine revs.
     

    A.Texas.Yankee

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    Mar 21, 2012
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    Has to do a bit more to do with pressure, as well. The less resistance the less pressure required to send it so the bullet starts to move before any real pressure builds up behind it. Best way to think of it is like spitting a plastic BB through a regular size straw vs that same BB through a larger diameter straw. Which straw do you think will get you further distance? The smaller one because you're able to build more pressure behind it. Same breath, different physics.

    Sent from my LG-LS995 using Tapatalk
     
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