Wally World Security Guard

45tex

TGT Addict
Feb 1, 2009
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Between woke business idiots and politicians we don't have a chance.
 

Axxe55

MIA-BOLO.
Dec 15, 2019
20,245
113
Nowhere.....Just here in East Texas.
Here is a hypothetical question. If it was customer that saw a person with a gun, reported it to a contracted security guard, and the security guard confronted you and questioned you, are you legally required to tell them, "Yes, I'm armed, and I have a permit to carry."

If WalMart doesn't prohibit the legal carrying of firearms, and it's concealed, couldn't you tell the security guard that it was none of his business, or that customer that informed him must be mistaken?
 

mongoose

Active Member
Sep 10, 2012
524
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nm
Here is a hypothetical question. If it was customer that saw a person with a gun, reported it to a contracted security guard, and the security guard confronted you and questioned you, are you legally required to tell them, "Yes, I'm armed, and I have a permit to carry."

If WalMart doesn't prohibit the legal carrying of firearms, and it's concealed, couldn't you tell the security guard that it was none of his business, or that customer that informed him must be mistaken?
I think I could have done as you suggested. However, he might have gone to get the Sheriffs Deputy who was on duty and it may have become a bigger hassle than just educating him on the store's policy.
 

toddnjoyce

TGT Addict
Sep 27, 2017
11,369
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Boerne
I think I could have done as you suggested. However, he might have gone to get the Sheriffs Deputy who was on duty and it may have become a bigger hassle than just educating him on the store's policy.

Dude, a security officer CANNOT prevent you from leaving, even if it is to go get a cop, UNLESS the guard witnessed you committing a felony.
 

Axxe55

MIA-BOLO.
Dec 15, 2019
20,245
113
Nowhere.....Just here in East Texas.
I think I could have done as you suggested. However, he might have gone to get the Sheriffs Deputy who was on duty and it may have become a bigger hassle than just educating him on the store's policy.

It was not a suggestion, but more like a hypothetical, or what-if for discussion.

You are not required to have to produce a permit to a private citizen. And most security guards are not certified peace officers, so I don't think he can demand to see your permit, and if the store isn't prohibiting the legal carry of firearms in their store, I'm not seeing where he has the right to know that you are carrying.

And secondary, if he did get an actual LE officer, again unless a criminal act was being committed, I don't think anything would go any further than that.
 

Maverick44

Certified All-American Gun Nut
Here is a hypothetical question. If it was customer that saw a person with a gun, reported it to a contracted security guard, and the security guard confronted you and questioned you, are you legally required to tell them, "Yes, I'm armed, and I have a permit to carry."
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No. Security officers are private citizens with no legal authority to make you do anything. You can lie to your heart's content or simply ignore their question just like you could for any other private citizen. They also can't detain you. If you decide you don't want to talk to them, you can simply turn around and leave the store.

If they tell you to leave, then I would recommend you doing so because then you can run into issues with trespassing, but other than that they have no power.
 

Axxe55

MIA-BOLO.
Dec 15, 2019
20,245
113
Nowhere.....Just here in East Texas.
No. Security officers are private citizens with no legal authority to make you do anything. You can lie to your heart's content or simply ignore their question just like you could for any other private citizen. They also can't detain you. If you decide you don't want to talk to them, you can simply turn around and leave the store.

If they tell you to leave, then I would recommend you doing so because then you can run into issues with trespassing, but other than that they have no power.

That was pretty much what I thought.

If the store doesn't prohibit the legal carrying of firearm, IMO, regardless of what the customer or the security guard think, is irrelevant. It's none of their business. And I would think telling the security guard that the customer must be mistaken, might be the best approach.

This, like I said is strictly hypothetical and simply for discussion. Each person will have to decide for themselves in how they would deal with this scenario. And in fairness to @mongoose, I don't think that he failed in the way he handled the situation in the least. My posts are more about options or alternatives in dealing with a similar scenario.
 
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