want to reload.

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by hkusp1, Jun 20, 2009.

  1. hkusp1

    hkusp1 TGT Addict TGT Supporter

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    i've been looking into reloading lately and i've been looking a the lee products because of the price factor being a college student and all, but i was wondering if anyone had any suggestions on what type of equipment to use?
     


  2. MadMo44Mag

    MadMo44Mag TGT Addict

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    1st What are you loading- what calibers?
    2nd Rifle - pistol - revolver?
    3rd What type of load or ammo do you require? (plinking, target, match)
    4th How often do you shoot? (how many rounds per month)
     
  3. I bought my RCBS Rock Chucker 32 years ago & still use it. @ the time I was unemployed and 18. RCBS & Dillon have damned good warranties. I bought a second hand Dillon SDB last year.
     
  4. hkusp1

    hkusp1 TGT Addict TGT Supporter

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    I shoot 45 acp, 5.56/223, 40sw, and 9mm I just shoot fmj ball ammo and I hardly shoot maybe 100 rnds in 4 months because of the cost of ammo and school, the reason I want to reload is for some what cheap shooting and stock piling. Is it illegal for a joe blow to sell reloaded ammo? It's not my intention to sell reloads it's just a question.
     
  5. Texas1911

    Texas1911 TGT Addict

    May 29, 2017
    Austin, TX
    Selling reloads requires an FFL.

    Technically, selling reloads for cost, to friends, or loading for them isn't illegal since it is not commerce. If they happen to buy dinner or beer, or perhaps some bullets, it's just they are a generous person.
     
  6. MadMo44Mag

    MadMo44Mag TGT Addict

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    Lee makes some great products and I have used Lee products for years.
    Loading ammo is just like anything else, you need good basics and practice to achieve the desired end result.
    Follow the link below; it takes you through the various types of presses and the pros and cons of each type.
    Types of Ammo Loading Presses and Their Function - Progressive Press

    Now after reading the info on that link INO - considering that you are loading rifle and pistol, your quantity needs are not high I would recommend the LEE 50th Anniversary Kit.

    This is a single stage press so learning the basics will be much easier and in the end less expensive.

    This kit has pretty much everything you need to get started and the price is relatively cheap for the amount of equipment you get. Also get no less than three reloading guides from three separate sources.

    I learned reloading in the late 70’s and in the early 80’s got re-educated by a good friend that was a commercial re-loader. Reloading is a habit thing. What I mean is that if you learn bad habits when you start your ammo will suffer and so can you if a gun blows up in your hand because of said bad habits. Thankfully I got re-educated because I had some very bad habits and after this revelation my ammo quality and quantity greatly improved.

    As time goes on you may want to step up to a progressive but be WARNED this will cause great expense. The cheaper and fast you can manufacture ammo the more you shoot and the greater need for new calibers and guns is.

    There are two basic schools of thought on reloading.
    There is the HAND LOADER who is very exacting in every aspect of the operation. There ammo is all match grade. They are not in any hurry to produce large amounts of ammo at any one time.

    Then there is the RE-LODER who manufactures average ammo in quantity.
    There ammo is good but not match grade. The have a squib now & then. They produce 100’s of rounds every time they sit at the loading bench. They are the trained monkey that pulls the handle.

    Then there are guys like myself.
    I practice both sides of the spectrum.
    I load range ammo on a Hornaday progressive and turn out very good ammo but not match grade.
    When I want match grade; out comes my Leee Single stage and I load every round with complete concentration and attention to detail.
    Hope this is of help and happy shooting


    -MadMo
     
  7. Texas42

    Texas42 TGT Addict

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    I am new to reloading too.

    I got a Lyman turret press kit. It came with just about everything you need except a pair of calipers. I currently load pistols, but I plan on starting rifles soon.

    I'm never in a hurry. I did it to save money (kinda), but I really enjoy doing it.

    Oh, and +1 on getting lots of manuals from different sources.
     
  8. hkusp1

    hkusp1 TGT Addict TGT Supporter

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    Ok so i have chosen a lee single stage kit so i can take the time and learn it the right way next paycheck i'm gonna go pick one up, i also asked a police friend of mine if i cleaned there pistol range a couple of times a week if i could keep some brass so i got that in the works. Can anyone recommend any good reloading literature??

    oh yea my girl is alittle mad with me cause the only space have to do this is in the living room anyone know how to remedy her anger with me at the moment that doesn't involve diamonds?
     
  9. micah7488

    micah7488 Member

    make a covered porch or garage cause the stuff with cleaning and the powders can they affect ya if its not well ventilated? plus having heavy metals (lead is a heavy metal, right?) is something id keep as far away from my young 'un takes a very long time to work through the blood and most times medicine is needed to get it out.

    correct me if i am wrong, i was reading a reloading book that i thought said those same things. the book was "the abc's of reloading"
     
  10. MadMo44Mag

    MadMo44Mag TGT Addict

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    Man, if I had that answer I'd be rich! LOL!!!!

    I reload in y home office. The bench is set up across from my desk.
    Since I don't cast bullets and most of what I load is plated or jacketed I don't worry to much about lead. A little cross flow ventilation from a fan helps keep the powder odors down.

    Now if there are small children in the house never leave your reloading station unattended. Common sense dictates that kids will be kids and curiosity killed the cat.

    As for books - Lyman's 49th Edition Reloading Handbook, The ABC's of reloading 8th addition, Hodgon 2009 Annual reloading manual, Speer's Manual No. 14 , Sierra's 5th Edition Reloading Manual .

    I would recommend every one of these and I own all but the ABC's book.
    Also another good source is a used book store. Older manuals give you a "Look Back" when adjusting load ranges and recipes. Powders get improved over time and it's nice to be able to look back and see how they were changed based on the loading data. Right now this may not seem important but in time it will be.

    You can never own enough reloading manuals. Seldom do any two have the same data for the same round configuration. That's why you need at least three manuals.

    -MadMo
     

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