What do you think about this brisket cook time?

satx78247

TGT Addict
Jun 23, 2014
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113
78208
And you probably didn't want to eat a chicken for several weeks if not months at least that's the way I was after the Jaycee food booth at the Benton County Tennessee Fair where we served hamburgers and steaks ruined on the griddle among other things. East of the Mississippi barbecue almost exclusively means whole pork shoulder, a rarity in Texas.
cygunner,

FYI, what I'm known for in SC (IF I'm known for anything good??) is cooking whole pigs on my pit at the family plantation. = My pit can cook two 80-100 pound whole pigs, some sausages & a few chickens on that pit in one run..

That much meat with the sides/drinks make for a pretty large party.

yours, satx
 

Havok1

New Member
May 10, 2021
17
13
US
When I do my briskets I season them up(I just buy a dry rub) and cook them at 275 on the smoker. I know a lot of people cook at 225, but I haven’t noticed any difference in outcome but it brings my cook times down quite a bit, which means I can put a brisket on at 6am and have it done in time for dinner. As far as wrapping, I can go either way. Lately I’ve been avoiding it. Brisket is done somewhere between 195-205 internal temperature. Should jiggle like a block of jello when it’s done. Rest for an hour, or longer if you like, then slice and eat.

that’s my method.
 

billtool

Well-Known
Nov 16, 2008
1,276
113
The Wooldlands
When I do my briskets I season them up(I just buy a dry rub) and cook them at 275 on the smoker. I know a lot of people cook at 225, but I haven’t noticed any difference in outcome but it brings my cook times down quite a bit, which means I can put a brisket on at 6am and have it done in time for dinner. As far as wrapping, I can go either way. Lately I’ve been avoiding it. Brisket is done somewhere between 195-205 internal temperature. Should jiggle like a block of jello when it’s done. Rest for an hour, or longer if you like, then slice and eat.

that’s my method.
I like it. It's a bit warm for me, though. I'm a 250 degree guy, wrap with pink paper at 165 and pull at 203. Vive la difference!
 

Axxe55

Just a man, and his dogs.
Dec 15, 2019
18,257
113
somewhere.....East Texas.
When I do my briskets I season them up(I just buy a dry rub) and cook them at 275 on the smoker. I know a lot of people cook at 225, but I haven’t noticed any difference in outcome but it brings my cook times down quite a bit, which means I can put a brisket on at 6am and have it done in time for dinner. As far as wrapping, I can go either way. Lately I’ve been avoiding it. Brisket is done somewhere between 195-205 internal temperature. Should jiggle like a block of jello when it’s done. Rest for an hour, or longer if you like, then slice and eat.

that’s my method.
That method may work fine for you and on your smoker. But every smoker is different, and will turn out different results.

For those new to smoking meats on a smoker, I tend to lean towards them erring on the side of less than done. If the meat comes off the smoker less than the desired doneness, it can be reheated or cooked an additional amount of time in the kitchen oven with controlled temperature and time, and still end up with meat with a great smoke flavor.

If they cook at too high a temperature or time on the smoker, and too high an internal temperature results and the meat is overly done, pretty much can result in inedible meat that is way too tough to eat.
 

Havok1

New Member
May 10, 2021
17
13
US
That method may work fine for you and on your smoker. But every smoker is different, and will turn out different results.

For those new to smoking meats on a smoker, I tend to lean towards them erring on the side of less than done. If the meat comes off the smoker less than the desired doneness, it can be reheated or cooked an additional amount of time in the kitchen oven with controlled temperature and time, and still end up with meat with a great smoke flavor.

If they cook at too high a temperature or time on the smoker, and too high an internal temperature results and the meat is overly done, pretty much can result in inedible meat that is way too tough to eat.
Yeah. Plenty of ways to cook it that result in great food. This is just the way I’ve found works best for me. When I cooked at 225 I would usually have to cook overnight, which wasn’t the end of the world but not as convenient as firing it up in the morning. I also have a wireless thermometer that makes it very easy to keep track of the internal temps.
 

billtool

Well-Known
Nov 16, 2008
1,276
113
The Wooldlands
I too, splurged on a wireless thermometer. MEATER is the brand I purchased. Very pleased and recommend it highly. I bought the upgrade and have smoked with it 10-15 times. Still works great. About $100.00 when I bought it three or so years ago.
 

cygunner

Devil's Den - Gettysburg
Jan 20, 2021
785
93
Cypress, TX
I too, splurged on a wireless thermometer. MEATER is the brand I purchased. Very pleased and recommend it highly. I bought the upgrade and have smoked with it 10-15 times. Still works great. About $100.00 when I bought it three or so years ago.
As Axxe says, every smoker is different. I have used my Masterbuilt so much that I can tell by time and by looking through the window at about when it's done and I use an instant(nearly) reading Taylor electronic meat thermometer to check myself. Majority of the time I have guessed pretty well.
 

satx78247

TGT Addict
Jun 23, 2014
8,495
113
78208
I’m typically a fruit wood guy. Been digging pecan lately though. It’s cheaper and still fairly mild.
billtool,

PERSONALLY, I prefer NO mesquite for smoking, as I don't care for the taste.

Make mine PEACH or PECAN with some GREEN HICKORY. I use OAK only if I cannot get enough peach/pecan/hickory.

just my OPINION, satx
 

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