What does the printed gun tell us about marketing?

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  • benenglish

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    I've put this under "General" instead of "Handguns" because it's about marketing and perceptions, not about the firearm.

    We've previously covered the printed 1911 becoming something more than just an idea or a piece of plastic that falls apart in a shot or two, here: http://www.texasguntalk.com/forums/...71-*metal*-3d-printed-1911-including-bbl.html and here: http://www.texasguntalk.com/forums/general-firearms-ammo/52430-3d-printed-1911-a.html .

    Solid Concepts is taking it into production and if you want one of the first 100 as a collector's item and historical artifact, you can have one for the bargain price of USD$12K!

    See: 3D Printed Metal Gun Will Sell to Lucky 100 » Solid Concepts, Inc.

    OK, I understand that the first 100 of anything can be more valuable and collectible. This, however, strikes me as a ridiculously overpriced stunt.

    Are there really that many people so swimming in money that they'd buy this, especially when the demo video was so underwhelming? See:


    Will this thing sell out?

    What is it with the over-the-top pricing of "collectible" guns these days?

    What's your personally-witnessed benchmark for "Stupidest Amount Of Money Spent On A Firearm?"

    I think the sale of this particular firearm says something about the way the market and economy are changing...I just don't know what.
     

    jrbfishn

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    The technology is fairly new, so , yeah, they are probably expensive to make. But 12k for one that don't work all that well, naw. But, given the number of people in austin that bought Glocks as status symbols and did not even know what ammo went in it or caliber,
    A. yes it is.
    B. Yes there are
    C. Oh yeah, they will. And stand in line to have the first


    from a non-recovering coffeeholic
     

    Whisky

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    ..But, given the number of people in austin that bought Glocks as status symbols and did not even know what ammo went in it or caliber..

    huh ? now that's a joke, right ? please tell me that's a joke..

    (high price for a gun....I'm about to find out, in an auction, about "over-the-top price paid for a gun.....(?))
     

    General Zod

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    Remember, this isn't just the first 100 of something that's going to go into regular production. This is the first 100 of the first EVER metal 3D printed firearm. This makes them all instantly rare. So, as collector's items go, I can totally see that price.

    Plus, I recall reading on the Solid Concepts website that it cost $3000 to make one.

    They're not going into the firearms-printing business, it was a proof-of-concept for their metal printing technology to prove their parts would be durable and capable of handling high pressure without failure. If they can turn around and profit off a limited run of a truly unique firearm, then more power to them.
     

    benenglish

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    ... This is the first 100 of the first EVER metal 3D printed firearm. ...
    I hadn't considered it in those terms. That makes more sense.

    This isn't buying 1 of the first 100 from a new manufacturer. It's like owning 1 of the first 100 rifled barrels. Or 1 of the first 100 cartridge firearms. It's buying 1 of the first 100 of a new application of a technology, not merely a new maker.

    If the future holds that this was truly a watershed event in the history of manufacturing (Dare I say it - a "Game Changer!";)), then those prices make sense. The buyers must be willing to bet on that. To me, it's not an obviously good bet but it certainly might be so I understand better, now.

    Thanks for the different perspective.
     
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