You know your a lightweight when. . .

Discussion in 'General Firearms & Ammo' started by Texas42, Nov 19, 2009.

  1. Texas42

    Texas42 TGT Addict

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    I've been reloading pistol's for a while, but today, I shot my first Rifle reloads.

    I wanted to try and test out three different powder levels for my 7mm remington magnum. I only had 18 rounds loaded (had 20 cases, but I trimmed one case way too short and I kind of forgot to fill the 19th with powder before I put all my powder stuff away) 162 grain hornady interlock BTSP over 55-57 grains of IMR 5831.

    Anyway, the first few rounds felt great. The 10th or 11th, I could tell I was going to be sore. By the 18th, it hurt.

    I had some 140 grain Winchester silvertips left over. I was going to test three of them and compare. I shot two. On that last shot, it hurt, quite a bit. . . I wasn't going to shoot that last round.

    I felt kind of wimpy.

    Anyways, I keep hearing how the 7mm remington magnum is a "light recoiling magnum." I guess I'm still new to this whole concept of rifle recoil. I've shot a 44 magnum, 357 mag, and a T/C in 45-70 and never felt like anything hurt to shoot.

    Anyway, my rifle couldn't shoot great groups, . . . ok so it was me not the rifle, but I'm going to get better. The trigger on my Ruger mII is a bit on the heavy side. Anything I could do about that?
     


  2. c_m_shooter

    c_m_shooter Member

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    Paradise
    When shooting the 7mm for groups, don't shoot them all at once. Shoot a group, then play with a .22 or pistol for awhile, then come back to the rifle in a little while. A sandbag between your shoulder and the gun can take a little bit of sting out of it. Big guns are not fun to shoot off a bench, no matter what anyone tells you. I have a .270 and it is great to shoot off hand, but I don't care for sitting down behind it for extended bench shooting. I must be more of a wimp than you, because I would never even want to buy a 7mm or .300 magnum. I can't shoot far enough for a couple hundred fps to make a difference over what I already have.
     
  3. Texas1911

    Texas1911 TGT Addict

    May 29, 2017
    Austin, TX
    18 rounds out of a 7mm Mag is going to hurt. It's not a "light" magnum by any means, especially when you are using the heavier end of the bullet spectrum. It's not quite up to par on a .300 Win Mag, but it still isn't fun.

    I would consider a muzzle brake.

    You should fire 3 shots then let the rifle cool. The fire 3 more shots, and repeat. The final shot should leave the barrel warm to the touch, not hot. Too many people don't take the time to let the barrel cool, and just hammer away. You can do that on bull barrel rifles, but it's not going to work well on a thin barrel.

    Ruger's aren't the most accurate rifles on the market either. Their triggers are so-so, as you found out. The heavy pull weight of the trigger means the rifle is moving during the lock-time. I find shooting for tight groups with a heavy trigger, or an un-crisp trigger very difficult at times, especially if the rifle is light (sub 10 lbs.).

    I do not like the wuss pads and all that mess because it alters the length of pull and reduces the control you have on the rifle. It also can increase the likelyhood of getting scoped, because the rifle's butt will squish and you have the same focal length on the scope regardless of any length of pull.
     
  4. Texas42

    Texas42 TGT Addict

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    I wasn't in a hurry, those shots took over an hour.

    I think if I really wanted a target rifle, then I should probably get another rifle.

    I guess it will go on the list.
     
  5. Dawico

    Dawico TGT Addict

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    Mid range speeds will probably help in your groups. Loading hot rounds usually decreases accuracy. It will help with recoil a bit also, which will help accuracy and reduce the chance of developing a flinch as well.

    The cheapest way to help a gritty or heavy trigger is to shoot it a lot. Dry firing helps and is free. It will also get you more comfortable with the feel of the trigger and the gun.

    Another option is to trade it for a BB gun. Hahaha, sorry, I had to.:rofl::rofl::rofl:
     
  6. Texas1911

    Texas1911 TGT Addict

    May 29, 2017
    Austin, TX
    Filling up the case will give you better accuracy on the load. That doesn't always translate into a hot load, just a particular powder that has alot of volume per weight. Varget is widely used for this reason.
     
  7. Texas42

    Texas42 TGT Addict

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    The phrases "shoot alot," "7mm remington magnum," and "cheapest" don't really go together very well. Even reloading only knocks the price down to about 50 cents plus brass ( I haven't figured out how long it lasts with my loads, just yet).
     
  8. armadillo

    armadillo Member

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    You can buy a heavy leather shoulder pad/harness to wear when shooting hard kicking rifles from the bench. Or, do like I do and take a heavy jacket to wear when shooting from the bench.
     
  9. dee

    dee Well-Known

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    Red River Way
    A muzzle break will help alot I shot a 7mm Rem Mag a week or two ago with a break put exactly 20 rounds through it and felt great. As far as the groups go play with your reloads more and to me by far the trigger is a huge deal, I shoot horrible with a heavy trigger.
     
  10. TXchoctaw

    TXchoctaw Member

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    Euless
    I am having a muzzle brake installed soon on my Rem. 700 BDL. It will drive tacks, however at this time I will only drive 2-3 tacks. It gets brutal for sure.

    When I was younger it did not matter, but now that I'm in my mid-forties................I really enjoy my 22-250.
     

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