Chambliss Wins Run-Off Election

Discussion in 'News Articles' started by chevydeerhunter, Dec 2, 2008.

  1. chevydeerhunter

    chevydeerhunter Well-Known

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    Georgia Sen. Saxby Chambliss Wins Re-election in Runoff

    Republican U.S. Sen. Saxby Chambliss fended off Democratic challenger Jim Martin after a monthlong sprint of post-general election campaigning that drew national political heavyweights from both parties.


    ATLANTA -- Georgia Republican Sen. Saxby Chambliss handed the GOP a firewall against Democrats eager to flex their newfound political muscle in Washington, winning a bruising runoff battle Tuesday night that had captured the national limelight.
    Chambliss' victory thwarted Democrats' hopes of winning a 60-seat filibuster-proof majority in the Senate. It came after a bitter month long runoff against Democrat Jim Martin that drew political luminaries from both parties to the state and flooded the airwaves with fresh attack ads weeks after campaigns elsewhere had ended.
    Minnesota -- where a recount is under way -- now remains the only unresolved Senate contest in the country. But the stakes there are significantly lower now that Georgia has put a 60-seat Democratic supermajority out of reach.
    With 70 percent of the precincts reporting, Chambliss captured 60 percent to Martin's 40 percent. Chambliss' win is a rare bright spot for Republicans in a year where they lost the White House as well as seats in the House and the Senate.
    "It's been a hard and tough four weeks," Chambliss said at a victory party in Cobb County. "We had a hardcore campaign on both sides and while things look good right now, we're going to continue to follow the returns as they come in."
    Chambliss' mantra on the runoff campaign trail was simple: His re-election was critical to prevent Democrats in Washington from having a blank check. Chambliss, 65, had angered some conservatives with his vote for the $700 billion bailout of the financial services industry and his early support in 2007 for the guest worker provision in President Bush's immigration bill. But fearful of unchecked Democratic dominance, some came back into the GOP fold Tuesday.
    Martin made the economy the centerpiece of his bid, casting himself as a champion for the neglected middle class. He also linked himself at every opportunity to Barack Obama and his message of change. The Democratic president elect was a no show on the campaign trail in Georgia but did record a radio ad and automated phone calls for Martin.
    In the end, Martin, a 63-year-old former state lawmaker from Atlanta, wasn't able to get Obama voters back to the polls in large enough numbers to overcome the Republican advantage in Georgia, which has become an increasingly a reliable red state since 2002.
    Turnout was light throughout the state Tuesday. A spokesman for Secretary of State Karen Handel predicted between 18 and 20 percent of the state's 5.75 million registered voters would cast ballots -- far less than the 65 percent who voted in last month's general election.
    The runoff between the former University of Georgia fraternity brothers was necessary after a three-way general election prevented any of the candidates from getting the necessary 50 percent.
    Chambliss came to the Senate in 2002 after defeating Democratic Sen. Max Cleland in a campaign that infuriated Democrats. Chambliss ran a TV ad that questioned Cleland's commitment to national security and flashed a photo of Osama bin Laden. Cleland is a triple amputee wounded in the Vietnam War.
    He was a loyal supporter of President Bush and, as a freshman, rose to become chairman of the Senate Agriculture Committee. the former agriculture lawyer from Moultrie has been the ranking Republican on the panel since Democrats won control of the Senate.
    Some 3.7 million people cast ballots in this year's general election, and both sides have since tried to keep voters' attention with a barrage of ads and visits by political heavy-hitters.
    Former President Bill Clinton and former Vice President Al Gore both stumped for Martin. President-elect Barack Obama recorded a radio ad for Martin and sent 100 field operatives, but he didn't campaign in the state despite a request from Martin to do so.
    Several ex-Republican presidential candidates made appearances for Chambliss, including GOP nominee John McCain, former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee.
    Chambliss brought in Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, McCain's vice presidential pick, as his closer. She headlined four rallies for Chambliss across the state Monday that drew thousands of party faithful.

    We dodged a bullet in this election, but it's still way too close for comfort.
     


  2. Texan2

    Texan2 TGT Addict

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    Amen
     
  3. sharky47

    sharky47 Active Member

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    It's truly bizarre to find people that still think that the republican party will protect them from anything.

    In the last eight years we have had government growth on a level that would make the "evil Bill Clinton" cream himself (maybe on another dress, but that's a different thread....).

    What's scary is the idea that Bush and co. have built this police state and then soured the public so much to the "R" party that control for the most part was handed over to the "D" party. Personally, I see no difference any longer - but for the people that still believe the fantasy that the "R" stands for small government and freedom - you have only your party to blame for the shift in public demand to "change"......which really isn't change at all.



    Meet the new boss, same as the old boss......
     
  4. Jeff B

    Jeff B Active Member

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    The Republican Party as led by GWB was something unfathomable to many of us, and apparently to many voters as well. We got what we had coming, and hopefully the recent election coupled with the agenda of the incoming administration and the depression we are headed into will serve to get the Republicans and Libertarians onto a similar sheet of music and reverse our big government course.

    I too believe in "change"... but my version of "change" is pretty different than the folks headed to DC.

    Jeff B.
     
  5. sharky47

    sharky47 Active Member

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    ^^^^
    'Zactly......in a sick kinda way I was hoping Obama would win as well as the "D" party getting total control.

    Sounds kinda out there, but I know that there is no rescuing the fedgov - the slave has become the master and no matter who you elect to "serve" there, it will only hurt people. It's like a car hurtling towards a wall and the steering wheel locked. Obama winning is like increasing the speed so we can go ahead and get it over with. I feel that he can hopefully make things so unbearable for even the common person that they will look towards alternatives to the current machine.

    Sounds strange, but I knew that the lemmings would choose a "leader" regardless - might as well hope for one that will (hopefully) be the demise of the state......
     
  6. chevydeerhunter

    chevydeerhunter Well-Known

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    San Antonio
    I've never been one to think that the Republican party will protect me. All I want is the government to get out of my way and let me do for myself and my family. The only difference I see in either party is tax cuts. Other than that, they're all politicians wanting to stay in power.
     
  7. djspump2003

    djspump2003 Active Member

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    A lot of us conservatives feel pretty used by the Bush administration. The Dems have had a majority in both houses of Congress for 2 years. They have done nothing positive with that and their approval rating is lower than Bush's. If they have had that for 2 years and made no progress, why give them the keys to the whole thing?

    The analogy about the car hurtling towards a wall is a good one. But what the hell is on the other side of that wall?

    Bush did seem to set up most of the cards for a utilitarian state, though didn't he? Let's just nationalize everything. Then we can all tell our kids how things used to be while we are standing in line all day, waiting on that loaf of black bread that is supposed to last us for a week.
     
  8. sharky47

    sharky47 Active Member

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    On the other side of the wall?

    Who knows.

    Hopefully we will not have a revolution, but an evolution to a voluntary society free from state coercion. Many good folks up in NH are working to provide the products and services that people will desire in the absence of a violent state.

    Interesting time to be alive for sure.....
     
  9. 40Arpent

    40Arpent TGT Addict TGT Supporter

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    Houston
    I know where you're coming from, but had McCain been elected, we surely wouldn't have the gun/ammo/magazine frenzy going on right now, and we'd all feel a little better about our 2nd Amendment rights.
     
  10. sharky47

    sharky47 Active Member

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    Maybe, but Mcsame is an avowed enemy of the 4th - so pick your poison......
     

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