Contribute your cheap improvements to your guns in lieu of high dollar options.

Discussion in 'Articles & How-Tos' started by breakingcontact, Mar 31, 2014.

  1. breakingcontact

    breakingcontact TGT Addict

    Oct 16, 2012
    Outside Austin
    I've tried to be better about not just buying a solution to every problem I find or make up. Stupid consumerism.

    I painted the sights on a pistol to mimick the actual nice Dawson Precision sights on my carry gun.

    With the model paint on my other gun its about 80% as good for about 0.01% the cost.

    What small tips do you have for improving your guns on the cheap?
     


  2. BRD@66

    BRD@66 Well-Known

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    View attachment 28379
    I didn't like the way my G23 leaned out at the top when in my Serpa. I installed a pad (shim?) at the bottom of the holster to force the pistol butt to ride closer to my hip. The shim is two handles from add on tool straps from Lowe's
    View attachment 28380
     
  3. Dawico

    Dawico TGT Addict

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    Lampasas, Texas
    I have taken sand paper to a couple factory AR triggers with very good results. The sear angle on the trigger makes the trigger have to push the hammer back to be pulled. That makes for a heavy and gritty trigger pull. Changing the angle lowers the trigger pull and smooths it out considerably. I only work on the trigger, not the cut on the hammer.

    I can get a smooth 5.5# pull and keep it safe. I have fired many rounds through them will no trigger slip or doubling.
     
  4. Dawico

    Dawico TGT Addict

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    I have also painted some sights with good results. Plain black front and rear sights do not work very well for me.
     
  5. Moonpie

    Moonpie TGT Addict Lifetime Member

    Clip a coil or two off of a coil spring instead of buying a "better" spring.

    Bronze/copper cleaning brush, oil, and an electric drill used to hone/polish chambers and inside semi-auto magazines.

    Strip of leather with holes punched in it to act as a "speed strip" loader for revolvers.
     
  6. Brains

    Brains Well-Known

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    Cypress
    I tweak on most things in some way, eventually. Most extensive has been my 10/22, because well you're just supposed to - it's a 10/22! My 1911 needed a small clearance stoned into the recoil spring plug where it was smacking the barrel lugs. Holsters get little tweaks, because nobody can make them 100% perfect right off the bat. A little sanding here, a little heat and remolding there. One was a preference - I like to carry with the safety on, and the Kydex was molded with the safety off. So I changed that. But yeah, everything I have will probably eventually get touched in some way.
     
  7. Charlie

    Charlie TGT Addict TGT Supporter

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    Kerr County
    DREMEL TOOL! Hah! :boom::banghead:
     
  8. rsayloriii

    rsayloriii TGT Addict

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    H-Town, TX
    Got any pics? I might be interested in doing this because I've noticed how the hammer is pushed back as well.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337 using Tapatalk
     
  9. Charlie

    Charlie TGT Addict TGT Supporter

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    Kerr County
    Good point! Post 'em up, Dawico!
     
  10. Dawico

    Dawico TGT Addict

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    Lampasas, Texas
    Ask and ye shall receive.

    The key for me it to only work on the trigger sear and not the hammer sear. The hammer sear surface is in a position where I don't feel like I can work on it without rounding it off.

    If you remove your trigger, use the pins and reassemble the parts without the springs on the outside of your firearm. Then you can see how they mate and what happens when you pull the trigger. These parts are just standard AR fire control parts and cheap to replace if need be. If you push up on the hammer while pulling the trigger you can see that the hammer must move downward to be released. This is what makes the trigger pull so heavy.

    My goal is to eliminate that downward movement to ease the trigger pull. Some of the angle on the trigger sear needs to be removed. The best way I have found to do this is to place a piece of sand paper on a hard, flat surface and drag the sear face across it holding it upright almost square to the paper. You really only need to recut the top third of the face where the hammer sear engages it. It doesn't take much to recut it and you don't want to overdo it. Put the pieces back together on your "jig" to check the progress. I don't try to get it square, I just try to improve it a little. I would say make about ten to fifteen passes over 300 grit paper and then a few passes over 400 grit paper to smooth it up and remove any burrs from the corners.

    If you use the sandpaper with your hand it tends to round off the surface. This is not what you want to happen. You want to keep everything flat and square.

    My hammer still drops just a touch during trigger pull but very little compared to the factory cut.

    This particular trigger went from 7.5 - 9 pounds according to my Lyman trigger gauge. Now it is a smooth and consistent 5 3/4 pounds. It is also safe. You can take it down lighter but this pull works well for what I intend the rifle to do.

    This modular trigger unit makes it a little easier to see what is happening but the outside of your rifle works well also.



    [​IMG]

    This is the surface that gets the work done to it and the best way I have found to keep it flat and square.

    [​IMG]

    Just take it slow and test it often. The only way to know how it feels for sure is to put it all back together.

    Enjoy.
     

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