Glock Guide rod opinion?

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  • Ishtacka

    Member
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    0   0   0
    Apr 23, 2008
    56
    1
    Dickinson, Tx
    I am looking into purchasing a Glock (Not sure what Model). I have read some stories about Glock guide rods breaking (and in the case of a 1000 rnd torture test melting). I am not planning on putting 1000 rnds through it at one time, but what are your thoughts on a metal (Stainless, tungsten, titanium) guide rod? I've had good experience with my berettas and metal rods, should I expect anything from the Glock?

    Thanks for your insight,
    Ish
     

    lonewolf23c

    Active Member
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    Oct 2, 2008
    552
    1
    Idaho
    I have a Glock 23 .40S&W and the guide rod in it is some type of metal. Its not plastic like the new Berettas. I've fired approximately 1,000 rounds total from mine and haven't had a single problem. I love my Glock, and its extremely accurate. You won't have any problems with it.
     

    TxShooter

    Member
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    0   0   0
    Mar 16, 2008
    69
    11
    Houston Metro Area
    I placed over 10,000 rounds downrange with a Glock 21 with no failure of any kind. I was shooting hundreds of rounds per day for sometime with this weapon. Zero guiderod failures or any other...... Just my experience, but I do not forsee you having any issues with the factory guiderod.
     

    malladus

    Active Member
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    0   0   0
    Jul 20, 2008
    275
    1
    Houston-Dallas
    Occassionaly the plastic ones go bad, but they are not exactly expensive to replace. Typically if it breaks you can call Glock and they will ship you out a new one at no cost, and usually will throw in some swag as well for your trouble.

    I run stock ones in 5 of my six glocks. I've yet to have one break and I've got over 10K of rounds on at least one of them.

    The sixth one I use a stainless steel captured rod from lone wolf with a variety of ISMI flat springs on it. There are verying schools of though for the various metal guide rods, spring types, and captured versus uncaptured. GLock selected the captured model because the gun was designed for a military contract and the idea was KISS, so captured rod was the way to go. IF you are handy you can actually uncapture the spring and replace it with a new weight one if you like (commonly done by folks trying to stay stock for some competitions). The metal rods usually have a retaining nut at the end and you choose you spring weight and bang away. Uncaptured rods are usually found on competive pistols in unlimited, open or limited guns where allowed. Glocks run fine with them.

    For springs, folks will typically up the spring weight in 40 cal and .357 Sig glocks because they tradiational come with the same one as the 9mm models. Folks feel this reduces wear on the gun and cuts down on the locking block breaking. Another tactic is to use a lighter spring in a gun to recoil the felt recoil (counter intuitive, but works) this however can lead to FTE and FTF problems as well as the firing pin and trigger springs actually cocking the slide back a little as you pull the trigger and fire the gun causing ti to fire out of battery (not a good thing).

    For springs the most common are the ISMI springs which are flat and you can get from 11 pbs to 21lbs. The typical load weight is to go from a 17 to a 15 or 13 in a 9mm gun like the 17. They make them in various lengths for the various models. At 13 pounds and less you start to have issues with the slide cocking back on the trigger pull, but this can be solved by putting in a lightened firing pin spring set. Another option is a coiled wire spring, these are recommended alot by the competition shooters because they compress and unload energey consistantly. Flat springs will stack when fired meaning that a lighter spring will start to act like a heavier spring as it compresses, and then lighter again when it uncompresses. This will often lead to FTF issues in a gun running one if the loads get to light.

    Probably more then you wanted to know.

    malladus
     

    Gun-Works

    Member
    Rating - 0%
    0   0   0
    Oct 20, 2008
    52
    1
    Tennessee
    Occassionaly the plastic ones go bad, but they are not exactly expensive to replace. Typically if it breaks you can call Glock and they will ship you out a new one at no cost, and usually will throw in some swag as well for your trouble.

    I run stock ones in 5 of my six glocks. I've yet to have one break and I've got over 10K of rounds on at least one of them.

    The sixth one I use a stainless steel captured rod from lone wolf with a variety of ISMI flat springs on it. There are verying schools of though for the various metal guide rods, spring types, and captured versus uncaptured. GLock selected the captured model because the gun was designed for a military contract and the idea was KISS, so captured rod was the way to go. IF you are handy you can actually uncapture the spring and replace it with a new weight one if you like (commonly done by folks trying to stay stock for some competitions). The metal rods usually have a retaining nut at the end and you choose you spring weight and bang away. Uncaptured rods are usually found on competive pistols in unlimited, open or limited guns where allowed. Glocks run fine with them.

    For springs, folks will typically up the spring weight in 40 cal and .357 Sig glocks because they tradiational come with the same one as the 9mm models. Folks feel this reduces wear on the gun and cuts down on the locking block breaking. Another tactic is to use a lighter spring in a gun to recoil the felt recoil (counter intuitive, but works) this however can lead to FTE and FTF problems as well as the firing pin and trigger springs actually cocking the slide back a little as you pull the trigger and fire the gun causing ti to fire out of battery (not a good thing).

    For springs the most common are the ISMI springs which are flat and you can get from 11 pbs to 21lbs. The typical load weight is to go from a 17 to a 15 or 13 in a 9mm gun like the 17. They make them in various lengths for the various models. At 13 pounds and less you start to have issues with the slide cocking back on the trigger pull, but this can be solved by putting in a lightened firing pin spring set. Another option is a coiled wire spring, these are recommended alot by the competition shooters because they compress and unload energey consistantly. Flat springs will stack when fired meaning that a lighter spring will start to act like a heavier spring as it compresses, and then lighter again when it uncompresses. This will often lead to FTF issues in a gun running one if the loads get to light.

    Probably more then you wanted to know.

    malladus

    I think this fella knows his Glocks... Good advise.
     

    TAZ

    Well-Known
    Rating - 0%
    0   0   0
    Oct 17, 2008
    1,460
    96
    Round Rock
    Owned 5 Glocks over the years, and not a one has ever had a rod break. Doesnt mean that it cant or wont happen though. I am contemplating swapping out my 34 rod to a LW tungsten one, but for the added weight instead of any added mechanical functionality. The guide rod "issue" is a personal preferance more than anything else. Kind of like the full lenght guide rods in 1911's. Some people love them, some hate them. The goodnews is that most, especially the Steel or Stainless onesarent all that expensive so you can try it without having you wallet ache.
     

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