I beat the crap out of a tisas for the lulz

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  • zackmars

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    Depends.

    I mean, if the thread is “I threw my gun at some rocks” you gotta expect shit to go sideways

    6d88f7d476223fc41f059666188caf83e3772e2cee49ac2c1c329908713d7c36_1.jpg
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    Lead Belly

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    I totally get your goal, about wanting to knock the showroom finish of it, but to get honest holster wear, you need to concentrate on the right sections. sand, steel wool, scotch brite the high spots.

    The randomness of the wear pattern from driving over it....it doesn't sound like the look you are after. A few dings around the snout, the heel would be legit, as if dropped. Driving over it just crushes the mag well, I'd guess. Luckily the tire missed most of those passes.

    I used to work in a high-end cabinet shop and they would induce wear into the cabinets as it was the style. Some worm holes in the cherry were done with an awl, but not randomly. They had a few hammers that had a screw welded to the face to bash that indention in, etc. I realized then that it's more difficult than it appears to add honest wear marks.

    I've seen the black powder guys rub down the finish, then soak in vinegar or ketchup to get a little rust, nuetralize with baking soda, then add some oil and you've got patina started.

    Study some genuine artifacts for direction.

     

    zackmars

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    I totally get your goal, about wanting to knock the showroom finish of it, but to get honest holster wear, you need to concentrate on the right sections. sand, steel wool, scotch brite the high spots.

    The randomness of the wear pattern from driving over it....it doesn't sound like the look you are after. A few dings around the snout, the heel would be legit, as if dropped. Driving over it just crushes the mag well, I'd guess. Luckily the tire missed most of those passes.

    I used to work in a high-end cabinet shop and they would induce wear into the cabinets as it was the style. Some worm holes in the cherry were done with an awl, but not randomly. They had a few hammers that had a screw welded to the face to bash that indention in, etc. I realized then that it's more difficult than it appears to add honest wear marks.

    I've seen the black powder guys rub down the finish, then soak in vinegar or ketchup to get a little rust, nuetralize with baking soda, then add some oil and you've got patina started.

    Study some genuine artifacts for direction.


    It's a steel frame, a car isn't going to crush it

    The idea isn't "90 year old pistol" but rather "10 year old pistol thats been riding around a holster for all of the korean war"

    And honestly? The wear is far less than the wear on my m9a3 thats only 6 years old and hasn't been dropped a bunch, kicked a round, thrown at a rock pile and run over.
     

    DaBull

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    Find a pic of a beautifully worn 1911 then use the right wear technique (scotch brite pad, rust pitting, etc) to attempt to duplicate it. Or wear it in a leather hip holster where ever you go for a year, regardless of weather, and draw and holster it when you are bored.
     

    Sasquatch

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    New idea:

    Load that shit up with some .45 Super and see how many shots it takes to break the MIM bullshit in it, replace broken part, then repeat until all the piss poor Turkish pot metal is gone.

    As spiffy as some of the cheap 1911's *look* - after having a Filipino (Armscor made) 1911 break under recoil with some Cor-Bon 200 grain loads, I don't trust the pot metal guns anymore.
     

    Lead Belly

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    New idea:

    Load that shit up with some .45 Super and see how many shots it takes to break the MIM bullshit in it, I don't trust the pot metal guns anymore.
    Tisas aren't pot metal, or even close. Sounds like you've never even handled one.

    TiSAS has an annual production capacity of approximately 50,000 firearms and it is ISO 9001 certified

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    zackmars

    Free 1911 refinishing
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    Find a pic of a beautifully worn 1911 then use the right wear technique (scotch brite pad, rust pitting, etc) to attempt to duplicate it. Or wear it in a leather hip holster where ever you go for a year, regardless of weather, and draw and holster it when you are bored.
    isildur-no.gif
     

    zackmars

    Free 1911 refinishing
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    New idea:

    Load that shit up with some .45 Super and see how many shots it takes to break the MIM bullshit in it, replace broken part, then repeat until all the piss poor Turkish pot metal is gone.

    As spiffy as some of the cheap 1911's *look* - after having a Filipino (Armscor made) 1911 break under recoil with some Cor-Bon 200 grain loads, I don't trust the pot metal guns anymore.

    According to tisas, the entire gun save for the grips is forged.
     

    DaBull

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    New idea:

    Load that shit up with some .45 Super and see how many shots it takes to break the MIM bullshit in it, replace broken part, then repeat until all the piss poor Turkish pot metal is gone.

    As spiffy as some of the cheap 1911's *look* - after having a Filipino (Armscor made) 1911 break under recoil with some Cor-Bon 200 grain loads, I don't trust the pot metal guns anymore.
    My understanding is there are many different recipes for steel. Some countries do not have the metallurgical skill to finesse their recipe to get a steel just hard enough (yet cheap enough) to do the job. So, they often have to make steel far more hard than then necessary to ensure it doesn't fail. Norinco is supposedly like that--their 1911s are made of very hard steel to the point where I have heard some gunsmiths won't work on them unless the customer is willing to replace tools that break.
     
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    andre3k

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    New idea:

    Load that shit up with some .45 Super and see how many shots it takes to break the MIM bullshit in it, replace broken part, then repeat until all the piss poor Turkish pot metal is gone.

    As spiffy as some of the cheap 1911's *look* - after having a Filipino (Armscor made) 1911 break under recoil with some Cor-Bon 200 grain loads, I don't trust the pot metal guns anymore.
    Apparently the CMP thinks those pot metal pistols are good to go


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    Ausländer

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    What steel alloy does Tisas use for their 1911 frames and slides?

    42CrM04 Forged Carbon Steel or 420A Forged Stainless Steel.


    Does my Tisas Pistol contain any cast or MIM parts?

    Tisas does not use any cast metal parts on our firearms. The use of quality MIM parts on some models was used in prior generations of our 1911 products but in mid-2022 we began moving away from use of those parts. Tisas models produced after 11/1/2022 contain machined internal parts with the exception of the recoil spring plug which will continue to be a MIM part at a time to be determined.
     

    Sasquatch

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    Tisas aren't pot metal, or even close. Sounds like you've never even handled one.

    TiSAS has an annual production capacity of approximately 50,000 firearms and it is ISO 9001 certified

    View attachment 438069


    Nope - none of my LGS ever have any of their stuff. I haven't even seen a Taurus or Ruger 1911 in ages, save for the Rugers that Academy carries.

    According to tisas, the entire gun save for the grips is forged.

    That's actually pretty amazing given the price.

    My understanding is there are many different recipes for steel. Some countries do not have the metallurgical skill to finesse their recipe to get a steel just hard enough (yet cheap enough) to do the job. So, they often have to make steel far more hard than then necessary to ensure it doesn't fail. Norinco is supposedly like that--their 1911s are made of very hard steel to the point where I have heard some gunsmiths won't work on them unless the customer is willing to replace tools that break.

    And some - like Armscor - use MIM / cast parts at any opportunity to keep costs down. Maybe they're better - but I felt the sting once, which required gunsmithing to fix + better quality replacement parts.

    Apparently the CMP thinks those pot metal pistols are good to go


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    While that's cool for Tisas - its also really, really disappointing that they'd go with a Turk gun maker over an American gun maker for that.
     

    zackmars

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    Nope - none of my LGS ever have any of their stuff. I haven't even seen a Taurus or Ruger 1911 in ages, save for the Rugers that Academy carries.



    That's actually pretty amazing given the price.



    And some - like Armscor - use MIM / cast parts at any opportunity to keep costs down. Maybe they're better - but I felt the sting once, which required gunsmithing to fix + better quality replacement parts.



    While that's cool for Tisas - its also really, really disappointing that they'd go with a Turk gun maker over an American gun maker for that.

    Keeping in mind its a $250 pistol, it's pretty impressive.

    I still send people to Springfield when i get asked about getting a first 1911, but I'm perfectly content with my tisas, for what it is.
     

    Sasquatch

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    Keeping in mind its a $250 pistol, it's pretty impressive.

    I still send people to Springfield when i get asked about getting a first 1911, but I'm perfectly content with my tisas, for what it is.


    $250 for a FORGED gun would be a stupidly cheap way to base a good build out of. You could trash literally every part in it and just keep the slide and barrel and be further ahead than starting off with something like a Caspian frame / slide set depending what you were doing.

    After having a bad experience with shitty internal parts - I'd dump the slide stop for a known good piece, maybe the safety (I like low profile ambi levers, personally) and put a good trigger and spring in it. Hammer - I like the skeletonised "combat" type hammers but that's part for looks, part for not getting my fat pinched. A good beavertail with a bump is a must for me on a 1911, and I've gone from an A-1 arched MSH fan to a strait MSH fan. I still like fine checkering vs serrations on front & back straps as well, 30lpi if I can get it, but minimum of 20.

    You could get the slide milled for a dot for $100

    If only they made a .30 Super Carry version :roflsmile:
     
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