Texas SOT

Never make assumptions concerning conceal carry.

The #1 community for Gun Owners in Texas

Member Benefits:

  • Fewer Ads!
  • Discuss all aspects of firearm ownership
  • Discuss anti-gun legislation
  • Buy, sell, and trade in the classified section
  • Chat with Local gun shops, ranges, trainers & other businesses
  • Discover free outdoor shooting areas
  • View up to date on firearm-related events
  • Share photos & video with other members
  • ...and so much more!
  • TJ Willy

    Member
    Rating - 0%
    0   0   0
    Oct 27, 2008
    86
    1
    Wichita Falls
    This is not really Texas CHL related.

    I stumbled across this video watching some SWAT related training vids. It is a school related administrative video concerning dress codes. It was a reminder to me to never under estimate what one could be up against in a BG. Primarily what he/she might have concealed.

    CLICKY
    Lynx Defense
     

    JKTex

    Well-Known
    Rating - 0%
    0   0   0
    Mar 11, 2008
    2,011
    31
    DFW, North Texas
    I've seen that over the years and it is a real eye opener, but that's what they wanted. In reality, that kid could not have walked and acted near normal with all that weight and nothing apparently secured.

    But he sure could have had 2-3 of them and no one would have ever known it.
     

    djspump2003

    Active Member
    Rating - 0%
    0   0   0
    Oct 19, 2008
    267
    11
    Austin
    Yeah, I'd like to see someone try and walk with a shotgun shoved down their pant leg.

    The best video is still the one where that HUGE DEA agent shoots himself in the foot at a training seminar.
     

    fm2

    Event Coordinator
    Rating - 0%
    0   0   0
    Apr 27, 2008
    593
    21
    Yep, that makes me think :rolleyes:


    when I read or hear " I can't carry that " gun" it's too big to conceal".
     

    Jeff

    New Member
    Rating - 0%
    0   0   0
    Nov 13, 2008
    29
    1
    Yep, that makes me think :rolleyes:


    when I read or hear " I can't carry that " gun" it's too big to conceal".

    Do you carry on a regular basis? Just wondering...

    I find such statements perfectly understandable, personally. I carry a Glock 27/.40 in an inside-the-pants holster (Uncle Mike's) and even though it is a compact gun by design, the sheer bulk and weight make it, depending on what I'm wearing, somewhat difficult to conceal. Either my shirt is too tight or it's not long enough, even though I've went out and bought "carry" shirts. I now carry a single spare 15 round magazine instead of the smaller, 9 round magazines and all of that weight of the gun and the ammo adds up.

    I don't get these people who think it's "cool" or even reasonable to suggest that they carry a .50 Desert Eagle or anything even similar. Not anyone on this board, but I've seen it on others.

    Even my .38 special in my ankle holster is heavier than you'd expect when put on your ankle. (which is why it's only a backup and why I almost always just carry my Glock.) The weight and mass can even make it somewhat akward to walk especially if I'm wearing light running shoes like usual. Throws you off balance. I guess I need to either carry a third gun on my other leg or a couple more spare magazines.
     

    Jeff

    New Member
    Rating - 0%
    0   0   0
    Nov 13, 2008
    29
    1
    Speaking of videos, see the one where the guy shooting the Glock at a range shoots a round through his hand? It's all over Youtube.

    He had apparently attached a handle to the bottom rail of an auto-converted Glock and it failed. (from what I've heard; hard to tell from the video.)
     

    JKTex

    Well-Known
    Rating - 0%
    0   0   0
    Mar 11, 2008
    2,011
    31
    DFW, North Texas
    Do you carry on a regular basis? Just wondering...

    I find such statements perfectly understandable, personally. I carry a Glock 27/.40 in an inside-the-pants holster (Uncle Mike's) and even though it is a compact gun by design, the sheer bulk and weight make it, depending on what I'm wearing, somewhat difficult to conceal. Either my shirt is too tight or it's not long enough, even though I've went out and bought "carry" shirts. I now carry a single spare 15 round magazine instead of the smaller, 9 round magazines and all of that weight of the gun and the ammo adds up.

    I don't get these people who think it's "cool" or even reasonable to suggest that they carry a .50 Desert Eagle or anything even similar. Not anyone on this board, but I've seen it on others.

    Even my .38 special in my ankle holster is heavier than you'd expect when put on your ankle. (which is why it's only a backup and why I almost always just carry my Glock.) The weight and mass can even make it somewhat akward to walk especially if I'm wearing light running shoes like usual. Throws you off balance. I guess I need to either carry a third gun on my other leg or a couple more spare magazines.


    To properly and comfortably conceal and carry, "good" gun leather is a must. That includes a belt designed for carrying the weight of a gun. I don't know how to convey how important gear is to successful carry, yet people still try to use inferior holsters and belts not designed for it and complain that carrying and/or concealing is hard.

    I even carry without a belt pretty successfully, and that includes in athletic shorts with the elastic, drawstring waist like basketball shorts. But for that I use an Alessi Dual Talon I was lucky to get my hands on. But the best carry, it's usually a Brommeland belt and holster (Presentation Grade Max Con V) unless I'm wearing one of my Jim, "The Beltman" belts or even Wilderness Tactical 5 stitch Insructors belt. The Wilderness is great for casual wear and is much better that a regula belt, but still doesn't match a good leather gun belt. All that wthout looking like a SWAT team wanna be but just a guy.
     

    DoubleActionCHL

    Well-Known
    Rating - 0%
    0   0   0
    Jun 23, 2008
    1,572
    21
    Spring, Texas
    Even my .38 special in my ankle holster is heavier than you'd expect when put on your ankle. (which is why it's only a backup and why I almost always just carry my Glock.) The weight and mass can even make it somewhat akward to walk especially if I'm wearing light running shoes like usual. Throws you off balance. I guess I need to either carry a third gun on my other leg or a couple more spare magazines.

    I apparently need to lose a little weight. It would be great if the weight of my two Glocks would throw me off balance!!!

     

    Jeff

    New Member
    Rating - 0%
    0   0   0
    Nov 13, 2008
    29
    1
    To properly and comfortably conceal and carry, "good" gun leather is a must. That includes a belt designed for carrying the weight of a gun. I don't know how to convey how important gear is to successful carry, yet people still try to use inferior holsters and belts not designed for it and complain that carrying and/or concealing is hard.

    I even carry without a belt pretty successfully, and that includes in athletic shorts with the elastic, drawstring waist like basketball shorts. But for that I use an Alessi Dual Talon I was lucky to get my hands on. But the best carry, it's usually a Brommeland belt and holster (Presentation Grade Max Con V) unless I'm wearing one of my Jim, "The Beltman" belts or even Wilderness Tactical 5 stitch Insructors belt. The Wilderness is great for casual wear and is much better that a regula belt, but still doesn't match a good leather gun belt. All that wthout looking like a SWAT team wanna be but just a guy.

    Well, I'm not sure if you know exactly what type of holsters I carry, if you've actually tried them in the field, and know what type of belt I wear, but you seem to be calling them sub-standard. I have no problem with the gun staying/sticking onto my body/belt; I was just saying, there ARE calibers too big to carry concealed.

    I guess we can go back and forth all we want but the holster/belt/etc.. is only a small part of what you need to successfully carry concealed, IMO. If you're saying the gun/size/caliber doesn't matter then we should stop the debate right here because I disagree with every bit of it. It's a combination of it all and if you're telling me with some good gun leathers and a tactical belt will conceal a .50 DE, not only would it be ridiculous but it'd take a lot of work to conceal it. Some calibers and guns just shouldn't be carried for that purpose to begin with.

    Bottom line - IMO - there are certain guns that are concealable, others not. I carry every single day regardless of the weather or where I'm going, it's there with me. If I have my ID on me, so is my piece. My belt works just fine along with my Uncle Mike's holster. Would I like to throw some money out there for some other holsters to try them out? Sure would, but my point is, you could have the (large+large caliber) gun zip-tied and duct-taped to you ten times over but the fact remains it can still show depending on the type of shirt, etc...

    I would agree that good gun leather (for concealed) tops most any others, and like I said I still would love to try some of these leathers out. As far as outside-the-pants carry I'll definitely stick with my plastic-molded paddle holster which = zero problems for me.
     

    fm2

    Event Coordinator
    Rating - 0%
    0   0   0
    Apr 27, 2008
    593
    21
    Do you carry on a regular basis? Just wondering...

    Sure everyday, doesn't everybody?

    I guess we can go back and forth all we want but the holster/belt/etc.. is only a small part of what you need to successfully carry concealed, IMO.

    Maybe we need to look at how we define "carry concealed". If by carry we mean transport, and concealed we mean hidden, then almost anything can meet that criteria, OP's video. We probably need to think this through a little more, and raise the criteria.

    I'd suggest that we want a belt/holster that holds the gun securely, and in a fixed position through a wide range of activities. Think about drawstroke for a moment and how the holster affects the #1 count of the stroke. I believe the # 1 to be a cornerstone movement. We need a robust drawstroke, especially if we find ourselved in the middle of a criminal assault. The stroke starts with getting a fighting grip on the pistol. That is increasingly difficult if we add the variables of the real world, ie... layers of tasking, the FUT, etc....

    If the gun moves around you may not get the best grip on the pistol (adjusting the grip may cause you to lose the pistol all together or not be able to fire because of the grip ). It is also possible to not get the gun in hand on the first draw attempt, if the holster has moved around your belt line, rotated, shifted, fallen off the belt, etc...

    A furtive movement to the waist will very likely alert the BG of something untoward, doing so multiple times is bad for you.



    IMO - there are certain guns that are concealable, others not.

    A lot of people like this kind of statement. They can use it to validate their choice to eliminate 1911, G17, and Sig 228 sized handguns.

    I'd say most handguns are concealable,the first video is an extreme example, even those XL models you gave, given enough effort and planning. For most, they aren't worth the effort; like you said, there are much better choices.
     
    Top Bottom