Requesting Chronograph Assistance

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by CDF, Jan 4, 2009.

  1. CDF

    CDF Member

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    I finally picked up my reloading equipment and have been very satisfied so far.

    I did a FL resize and prep on a few cases and loaded a few dummy rounds while adjusting dies, trimmer lengths, etc.- so far, so good. I have been able to adjust everything and the runout results are typically within .001", which I am very pleased about.
    I set everything up to pretty much spec out at the same dimensions (headspace and OAL) as my unfired Federal GMM (for now). I am still waiting for my scope mount to show up so I can tailor the headspace/bullet seating specs to my specific rifle. I did run to Red's to pick up a few fired 223 cases for the sake of resizing- I realize that there will very likely be adjustments needed between my fire formed cases and the cases I used for the primary adjustments.

    Hopefully I will be seeing my scope mount in the next week or so and will fire form a few cases in my rifle and make the needed adjustments.
    I tried to get everything I needed to produce match quality ammo and think I've found a very happy medium.
    The only thing I didn't get was a chronograph.

    So.... here in a few weeks, would anyone in Austin be willing to let me go to the range with you and verify my worked up load velocities, please?
    I would certainly be willing to pay the range fees for assistance in this matter.
    Thanks.
     


  2. gunbubba

    gunbubba Member Lifetime Member

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    chronograph

    Do you have a range that will let you set up a chronograph?
     
  3. CDF

    CDF Member

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    gunbubba-

    I haven't yet made it to any of the outdoor ranges locally, so I can't really answer that question. I've been going indoors, so obviously a chrono is out of the question.
    I am hoping another forum member can help provide some insight.
     
  4. schokie

    schokie New Member

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    I haven't personally done this, so I don't know the process, but I have seen chrono's being used at Cedar Ridge range in Bulverde, west of Austin.
     
  5. gunbubba

    gunbubba Member Lifetime Member

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    chrono's at ranges

    you might want to call a few of the local outdoor ranges first to see if you can get an OK on setting up. I hear there is a new range just south east of town, but I can't remember the exact location. What part of town are you in?
     
  6. Ranger60

    Ranger60 Active Member

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    I would suggest calling Matt at the Lone Star Gun Range on the Austin side of Lockhart. Number is 512-801-2624. I always chrono any new loads to feel better about them. If you are roughly in the area of the velocities on published loads, you should be OK on pressure.
     
  7. CDF

    CDF Member

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    Thanks for the suggestions- I appreciate it.

    I may call a few places that have been suggested, but I am still without a chrono. Was hoping to find someone who has one and knows where it could be set up. I suppose having gone this far financially into reloading, I should probably just purchase a chrono anyway since I intend on trying different powders, bullets, etc..


    I am in far N. Austin

    Exactly- I would rather know for sure than guesstimate and find out the hard way.
     
  8. gunbubba

    gunbubba Member Lifetime Member

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    loaner chrony

    I do have an Oehler 35, but I am in far south Austin and I don't have much time for the range any more as it is. I was thinking if you were nearby we might be able to work something out one day. I'm a little leery of letting someone shoot through my Oehler, though, because I don't think parts are avaiable any more.

    As far as reloading without chrony's, I have been reloading for a pretty long time, like 35 years maybe. I only recently purchased a chronograph. I always relied on loading data, starting out below the maximums and watching how the cases/primers/accuracy reacted to the loads as I worked my way up and down the suggested load tables. Just be extra careful about checking your powder levels before you do your bullet seating and follow good reloading safety rules. If you have double charged a round or done something else that is really going to cause you a problem all a chronograph is going to do is tell how fast the bullet was going that blew up your gun. Loads that are a little (sometimes a lot) hot will usually let you know with some flattened primers long before you have any real problems. Just don't load up 1,000 rounds before you find out if the load works for you.

    If you are reloading to save some money that should keep you out of trouble and you should still be able to load rounds that are safe and give you excellent reliability and loads of fun. If you are reloading to develop match loads and are worried about standard deviations of loads, etc. then you need to bite the proverbial bullet and drop some cash on a chronograph. Actually, for a long time, plenty of guys who developed match ammo didn't chronograph either because they weren't around. They still made up some pretty good loads, it's just a little more trial and error.

    Sorry I wasn't more help.

    Good luck.
     
  9. CDF

    CDF Member

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    Thanks for the response gunbubba.

    I would feel pretty bad damaging someones chrono now that you mention it- accidents can happen.
    I realize in most cases that you get what you pay for although there are exceptions to that rule from time to time.

    I will need to do some research and figure out what the least expensive chrono is that is reliable and reasonably accurate, since I don't have much coin to invest right now.
    Any suggestions on what I should look for and/or stay away from?
     
  10. Old Man of the Mountain

    Old Man of the Mountain Active Member

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    To me accuracy is more important than velocity.

    I do it by the book.

    Begin at the suggested beginning charge, and load a few up at higher charges, staying well away from maximum.

    Keep checking for pressure signs as you test fire your loads.

    If you find a real good accurate charge on the low side, then just stick with that, no need for more speed.

    Try a powder that develops good velocity without building up high pressure, and see if that will work for you accuracy wise.

    Most of the time, adding a lot more powder only increases the velocity by a little bit, but can increase the pressure by a lot.
     

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