Shooting economics...?

Discussion in 'General Firearms & Ammo' started by thequintessentialman, Jun 19, 2017.

  1. thequintessentialman

    thequintessentialman Member

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    Just a pure cost vs value, economics question; is there enough value in the spent brass to offset the extra cost of OTS brass rounds vs cheap steel? For the moment mainly just 5.56/.223 and 7.62x39 (but who knows what the future holds...)
     


  2. Dawico

    Dawico TGT Addict

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    Simply put, no.

    While I am a reloader, 7.62x39 is one round I do not reload. Surplus steel is just too cheap.

    5.56 brass is plentiful so not worth it if you don't reload yourself.

    Other not so common calibers make it pay off better. Most common calibers the brass prices are too low to recoup much of your purchase price.
     
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  3. thequintessentialman

    thequintessentialman Member

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    OK, that helps.
    Recently I had gotten a brass catcher for my AR-7.62x39 just to cut down on annoying the guys in the six lanes to my right; did not realize how far these things fling. On a more recent trip to the range, some guy asked me if I was collecting my 10mm brass; I told him go ahead. We then had a short discussion on brass and it got my curiosity goin'.
    Thanks
     
  4. Dawico

    Dawico TGT Addict

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    10mm is worth picking up, but there isn't much for steel available in that caliber.

    But by the time you grab them (since you don't reload) and mess with selling/ trading them it isn't worth your time unless you have a good pile of them. Reloaders like gifts though.
     
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  5. thequintessentialman

    thequintessentialman Member

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    Yea, I had been saving my limited 8mm Mauser brass for a friend at work but he retired and I don't see him any more.
    The guy asking about the 10mm brass said that the case was the most expensive part of the reload. That got me wondering about the cheap steel vs more expensive reusable brass, that's all. The steel question was only for the two rifles mentioned. There's only a limited number of ranges that allow steel around here anyway.
     
  6. jrbfishn

    jrbfishn TGT Addict

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    I have supplies to reload 3000-5000 .223 and 9mm. But it is mostly in case I can't buy it. Ain't doing that shit again.
    I am going to be reloading some .223 for accuracy and distance though. Plinking ammo is just to cheap right now and all I have is a single stage press. Plinking ammo would take more time than it is worth to me.
    But. I do reload for .45 colt. Brass for it is expensive, so I scrounge every one I can get and carefully save mine. If I don't have to buy new brass, it is much cheaper than buying even the cheapest factory ammo. Even buying new brass it comes out a little ceaper than most store bought ammo. And at about $1 or more per round at store prices it is a definate savings. Not counting brass I can reload it for about 20 cents per round.

    It all depends on what caliber you are going to reload and how much new brass you have to buy. And what you are reloading for. If it is for accuracy, even on .223, reloading is the way to go. Much cheaper way to get match ammo. That stuff is crazy expensive.

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  7. TheDan

    TheDan DEPLORABLE TGT Supporter

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    Someone will chime in shortly that they can reload .223 for 16¢ or so per round, but that doesn't factor in all the time spent doing it. It's just not really worth it for high volume calibers like that.
     
  8. Moonpie

    Moonpie TGT Addict Lifetime Member

    Some calibers are cost prohibitive and almost require one to reload them.
    For example .45-110 Sharps, .30-40 Krag, etc.
    Common calibers such as 5.56, 7.62x39, 9mm, etc are much more economical and reloading them doesn't save you much at all once you factor in the work/time.
     
  9. robertc1024

    robertc1024 Not That Guy TGT Supporter

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    Yes.

    And Yes.
    But:

    I started out loading .38 spl & .357 mag - saved a fair bit of money, but it became more of a hobby. Then I started loading 9mm and .45 ACP. My time sitting on the couch watching TV is worth exactly as much as the same time making ammo, bu the end results are a lot more valuable. Everybody always says "But what is your time worth?" I ask "What else would you be doing?" Regardless, I load every centerfire I shoot except for 7.62x39 - not worth the cost of the dies IMHO. Albeit my "weird" stuff isn't to the level of the 'pie's, I can load a lot of 6.5 Grendel or .44 mags for what a factory box costs.
     
  10. jrbfishn

    jrbfishn TGT Addict

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    The monetary savings are the easy part of the equation to answer. It is simply a question of moetary cost. The time factor is also not that hard to figure if you want to.
    The hard parts to answer, is what else you would be doing instead. And what you get out of handloading. To some, it is a way to escape and relax, a matter of pride or a means to more accuracy. Or all three.
    To some, a necessary chore.
    That is a question only you can answer.


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