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Sig Sauer P226 Question

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  • lonewolf23c

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    Anyone here that owns a Sig Sauer P226?

    Do these pistols have a manual safety or decocking lever? Also are they just double action? Seems strange if it doesn't have a manual safety that the military would start going to this weapon away from the Beretta.

    My National Guard unit is being fielded with the Sig Sauer P-226 pistols so I'm kind of doing a little research. I haven't yet been able to get to the gun shop to look at one and familiarize myself with them yet, so any information would be helpful. Also how are they for ease of tearing down for cleaning?

    Thanks,

    Bill
    Lynx Defense
     

    lonewolf23c

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    OK, thanks. Guess I'm gonna have to go look at one up close. They look like a pretty nice pistol. Except they're a bit pricey.
     

    phatcyclist

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    OK, thanks. Guess I'm gonna have to go look at one up close. They look like a pretty nice pistol. Except they're a bit pricey.

    I had a Sig P232 a few years back. It was a great gun and was super accurate. I qualified for my CHL with it and it saved me from getting bit by a copperhead once. I sold it to get a 9mm fullsize pistol, but I have always wished I still had it for carry.
     

    SIG_Fiend

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    OK, thanks. Guess I'm gonna have to go look at one up close. They look like a pretty nice pistol. Except they're a bit pricey.


    Actually, if you look around just a bit, decent condition older P226's can still be found in the $400-550 area. The newer ones and newer Sigs in general are pretty ridiculous in price though. The old ones work perfectly fine though, and they are incredibly reliable.
     

    jar

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    There are two versions of the 226 out there. The traditional model is the 226 DA/SA and it has the classic Sig Decocking Lever. There is also the 226 DAK which is DA only.

    The 226 DAK that I shot had a trigger that felt and broke much like a smooth DA Revolver. If you allowed the trigger to return fully forward it had a nice light breaking feel, almost Smith like. There is short return spot where the trigger is reset but the force needed is slightly higher than a full reset, comparable to the first shot with a traditional 226.

    I loved all my 226s but have also always been a DA Revolver fan and were I to get another 226 it would most likely be the 226 DAK.
     

    lonewolf23c

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    Sounds like they're nice pistols. I'm gonna have to take one out and fire it before qualification next March to see how they will work at the range. Shouldn't expect any problems I wouldn't think.
     

    Dusty Rivers

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    My P226 is my "will never sell' gun DA/SA. I have had it for over 20 years. it never fails me. Decocking lever. Navy Seal's issue gun at one time. It flat out just works. For your CCW a P239 is a smaller version of the P226, well at least it functions and fells the same so switching back and forth is without thought. I like the hogue finger grips on the P239, but it makes the P226 grip too thick. The standard P226 checkered grips work great on it. You will love the P226. look for a Sig factory rework. Will be like new and knocks a couple of hundred off the price
     

    navyguy

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    The P226 is a very good pistol, and I shoot mine better than any other pistol I have. The DA/SA system with decoker is a very good option for a safety, without actually haveing lever to push. The standard DA will clock in arount 10 lbs, which someone would really need to work at to ND. I put a 19 lb main spring in mine, and that brought the DA down to about 9 lbs, which is still heavy enough for a good margin of safety, but a little easier to shoot. This spring reduction improved the already excellent SA pull down to 4 lbs from about 4.5. Sigs are one of the easiist to maintain. Talk down can be done vertually in seconds, and unlike Glocks, you don't need to pull the trigger.

    And these are great looking guns too!

    P226_1_OPM.gif
     

    lonewolf23c

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    The P226 is a very good pistol, and I shoot mine better than any other pistol I have. The DA/SA system with decoker is a very good option for a safety, without actually haveing lever to push. The standard DA will clock in arount 10 lbs, which someone would really need to work at to ND. I put a 19 lb main spring in mine, and that brought the DA down to about 9 lbs, which is still heavy enough for a good margin of safety, but a little easier to shoot. This spring reduction improved the already excellent SA pull down to 4 lbs from about 4.5. Sigs are one of the easiist to maintain. Talk down can be done vertually in seconds, and unlike Glocks, you don't need to pull the trigger.

    And these are great looking guns too!

    P226_1_OPM.gif

    Thanks for the pic. What are the thumb switches for on the side of the weapon towards the back of the slide? Is one of those a manual decocking lever? Or is this weapon like a Glock, keep finger off trigger type safety? Looks like one of those levers has to be some type of safety or what are they for??????
     

    juwaba98

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    Thanks for the pic. What are the thumb switches for on the side of the weapon towards the back of the slide? Is one of those a manual decocking lever? Or is this weapon like a Glock, keep finger off trigger type safety? Looks like one of those levers has to be some type of safety or what are they for??????


    Farthest one back, on top of the grip, is the slide release. The one just forward of that is the decocker. The button is the mag release and the remaining control is the takedown lever.
     

    navyguy

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    juwaba correctly pointed out the functions of those controls. As far as safety, no matter what system you gun uses, you should train you mind to get in sync with your finger, so it never goes in the trigger guard until you're ready to shoot. That's just a good practice. The DA/SA De-cocker systems will be a bit safer than a sticker fired gun, in as much as you're looking at a 9-10 lb DA initial pull, vs a 5~ lb striker fired pull.

    Some will argue that a gun with only one trigger pull (ie SAO, DOA, or Striker) is actually safer because there are less controls to think about, and there is only one trigger pull to get your muscle memory in tune with. I think it's up to the individual to decide what's best for them. I have a variaty of systems, and like the DA/SA best followed by a SAO (1911). I just like the clean crips trigger break the SA provides.
    On the other hand, my nightstand gun is a Glock.
     

    lonewolf23c

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    juwaba correctly pointed out the functions of those controls. As far as safety, no matter what system you gun uses, you should train you mind to get in sync with your finger, so it never goes in the trigger guard until you're ready to shoot. That's just a good practice. The DA/SA De-cocker systems will be a bit safer than a sticker fired gun, in as much as you're looking at a 9-10 lb DA initial pull, vs a 5~ lb striker fired pull.

    Some will argue that a gun with only one trigger pull (ie SAO, DOA, or Striker) is actually safer because there are less controls to think about, and there is only one trigger pull to get your muscle memory in tune with. I think it's up to the individual to decide what's best for them. I have a variaty of systems, and like the DA/SA best followed by a SAO (1911). I just like the clean crips trigger break the SA provides.
    On the other hand, my nightstand gun is a Glock.

    Thanks for the info on the trigger pull ratings. I own a Glock and love it, and I also Own a Colt Govt model 1911 .45acp, which I also love. For self defense though the glock just makes more sense due to you don't have to worry about trying to remember and release the safety first.

    I've been firing pistols for many years and as stated I never have picked up a gun and immediately placed my finger in the trigger well. It always goes along side the frame rail until ready to fire. It also gives you that extra split second to think before you pull that trigger.
     

    brickboy240

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    I own its little brother, the 13rd P228 in 9mm and love it. Very reliable and accurate - a gun you can trust. Mine is a 1991 made W. German piece and I'd never sell it.

    I have shot my brother's P226 and its very similar - accurate and reliable.

    you're getting a very good 9mm...I'd take a SIG over the huge and clubby feeling M9 anyday. The British SAS and Navy SEALs use the P226 SIG in 9mm.

    BTW, the US military issues the P228 SIG as the M11...or they used to.

    - brickboy240
     

    lonewolf23c

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    I own its little brother, the 13rd P228 in 9mm and love it. Very reliable and accurate - a gun you can trust. Mine is a 1991 made W. German piece and I'd never sell it.

    I have shot my brother's P226 and its very similar - accurate and reliable.

    you're getting a very good 9mm...I'd take a SIG over the huge and clubby feeling M9 anyday. The British SAS and Navy SEALs use the P226 SIG in 9mm.

    BTW, the US military issues the P228 SIG as the M11...or they used to.

    - brickboy240

    The army hasn't yet adopted the idea of using the SIG. It's slowly coming around to that though I think since my National Guard unit is getting them within the next few months.

    The M9 pistols we have are terribly outdated, and in dire need of some serious rebuilding. They're slightly worn out. Not from combat use, but from years of abuse by soldiers who don't care about them. Overall I don't think the Beretta 9mm pistols were that bad, they're just not taken care of correctly.
     

    JAFO

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    Ask around your local shops to see if anyone has a 226 or 229 CPO (Certified Pre-Owned). I got my 226 as a CPO for ~$500 and it's a super gun. The used or CPO guns usually have triggers that are well broken in.
     
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