Stock fix?

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  • PhulesAu

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    Not sure if thjs should be in gunsmithing, if so a moderator can move it. I have a B&C A3 that I had to add a Tubb's butt plate to, in order to get 16.75" LOP. I just pulled the factory pad and mounting plate off and screwed the Tubb's on. one of the mounting pads/ears has broken. Does anyone know of a tip/trick to fix this? I'm wondering if I should fill the stock with foam, and carve out about a 1/2" deep "reservoir" and fill that with Epoxy. when that sets, redrill a whole new set of holes. Sound like a plan?? Thanks
     
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    shortround

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    You have the correct solution. J-B Weld also is a miracle cure to odd shapes and forms. Just be sure to let any epoxy filler fully cure before drilling.
     

    vmax

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    2nd vote for JB Weld, the putty version might work better for this problem
     

    PhulesAu

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    Does JB Weld have a energetic Exothermic reaction? And after curing, can I just drill pilot holes then use sheet metal screws? thanks for the Tips.
     

    MrBigIron

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    I attempted to plug some smog fitting holes in a header with JB Weld and a bolt that was a little smaller than the hole. I let it cure fully. I started the car and the JB Weld lasted about 5 seconds before the bolt shot out of the header hole and the rather obvious exhaust leak ensued.

    Presumably, it was the pressure that caused it to fail. But it also began to melt. Eventually I cleaned it up as best I could and had a buddy mig weld the hole closed.

    I've worked with JB Weld quit a bit in its various iterations, but I wouldn't trust it for any machining or high stress work myself. If others have had better success with it then good on ya :-)


    Fred B.
     

    rsayloriii

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    There are epoxies designed for high temperature. Original JB Weld is not designed for that temperature range. Also, a lot comes down to correctly prepping the surface for proper adhesion.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337 using Tapatalk
     

    MrBigIron

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    Yeah, I also used it once on this crappy, ,22 ranch rifle we had. The wooden stock screwed onto the receiver via a blind bolt. Over the years the (female) threads in the receiver had stripped out. I used JB Weld to connect the two pieces and, once cured, it lasted all of about 2 minutes. I always prep and mix per label directions, and I always allow the required cure time. Both of those projects were done with original JB Weld though.

    About 10 years ago I was briefly into customizing Hot Wheels cars. To do so, I would drill out the rivets on the bottom of the car to separate the body from the chassis. Later I'd re-attach the two parts with JB Kwik. There was virtually no stress on the customized diecast cars, and the zinc alloy metal was clean, but I became so disappointed with the JB Kwik not holding that I eventually switched to micro-screws to reassemble the cars.

    I've also used the JB Weld putty, whatever that's called, and though easier to work with, the strength appeared to be about the same. I've had much better success with the clear epoxies, though I've never tried the JB Weld brand. You are correct though, I didn't use the high-temp variety on my header... I don't believe they offered such a thing back then. And who knows, it's been at least 10 years since I last tried JB products, perhaps they're better now. *shrug*


    Fred B.
     

    PhulesAu

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    JB Weld Original only rated to 500 Degrees. I actually read the faq's on the website. I don't believe I'll get close. I was considering using Devcon, but JB is a lot cheaper and Home Depot close.
     

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