Taurus PT-24/7

Discussion in 'Handguns' started by smittysmith13, Oct 31, 2008.

  1. smittysmith13

    smittysmith13 New Member

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    I have a new PT-24/7 that is acting up. Went to shoot the other day and the pistol has 2 issues. First, it is jamming towards the end of the mag. I figure it is the mag and that is something I can deal with. Second, the pistol is not shooting where you aim. You literally have to look around the gun to see where you are hitting. And this was at five yards...
     


  2. SIG_Fiend

    SIG_Fiend Administrator TGT Supporter Admin

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    How exactly is it jamming? Is it nosediving into the feedramp, failing to extract, or maybe some other type of jam? It has been my experience that, more often than not, many jams end up being mag related and most likely due to a worn mag spring. There are plenty of other mag related failures that can happen as well, such as with poor quality mags that have poor design tolerances (basically anything from Promag lol).

    As far as accuracy, did you buy the gun new or used? 9 times out of 10, almost all factory guns come with the sights setup properly for standard production ammo. Also, unless you are a very, very experienced shooter, the inaccuracy more often than not ends up being shooter error. Usually it's due to improper trigger pull or an improper sight focus. Sorry if I'm restating the obvious Smitty. ;) Heck, I still do it from time to time, and I've talked to extremely experienced shooters that still have the occasional flinch. It can take a lot of practice to get one's self trained to not jerk the trigger. ;)
     
  3. mac79912

    mac79912 Well-Known

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    +1 it could be your mag.Limp wristing is also a common factor for new shooters missing.Is this your first handgun?
     
  4. Kbear

    Kbear Member

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    Aug 21, 2008
    Next time you shoot try this:
    • Turn your target over too the blank side and make a black dot about the size of a silver dollar.
    • From the 7yrd line shoot a 5rnd string aiming in on the black dot.
    • DO NOT look at your target to see where the rnds impact while shooting. Continue shooting whith your point of aim being the black dot until all 5 rnds are spent.
    • If you have a 0 to 4 inch group a good distance from the point of aim, it's your weapon
    • If your target sooks like it was hit with buckshot, it's the shooter.
     
  5. smittysmith13

    smittysmith13 New Member

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    I sure appreciate all the input. I t is very helpful. I went back to the range yesterday and the pistol shot alot better. Did not experience any jams at all. I still do not like the way it shoots though. Compared to my Glock or my Para it does not shoot that good. Looking through the sights, you have to form an upside down T. I know this may not make since, but that is the best way I can describe it.
     
  6. SIG_Fiend

    SIG_Fiend Administrator TGT Supporter Admin

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    Austin, TX
    Smitty, here are a couple things you can try to help improve your accuracy.

    First off there is the "surprise break" method. Basically, once you line up on target and have your sights aligned, start focusing on the front sight hard. While doing this, you want to very, very slowly start easing the trigger back. Don't even try to "make" the gun shoot, just pull it back slowly, slowly increasing pressure. The whole time, it can help to say to yourself or out loud FRONT SIGHT, FRONT SIGHT, FRONT SIGHT to get your mind focused on concentrating there. If done correctly, eventually the gun will go off when you don't expect it. The point is, this keeps you from yanking the trigger back. With the sights in proper alignment, a front sight focus, and not yanking the trigger, the shots should hit right at the point of aim every time. There are other issues that can creep up as well though like improper sight alignment with the eye (this can really show up if you are cross dominant, wear glasses, etc). Though, other issues aside, start there and see how you do.

    Here's a good video to give you a visualization of this: YouTube - Jeff Cooper's Defensive Pistolcraft Tape Series

    Another thing you can try is to cut a fairly large square out of the center of mass of the target, say maybe the size of at least double your fist or larger. The reason you are doing this is to get yourself used to not seeing the bullet impact, or at least not looking at the hole after the shot. This is an incredibly tough habit to break, but believe me it's worthwhile. Basically what you do is you fire at least a box (preferably more) of ammo at the target straight through this large square, and try to keep everything within this empty square in the center. Once you've done that for awhile and can consistently keep all your shots inside this empty square, then get another target and cut another square in the COM, but this time make it a bit smaller. Keep doing this until you can work your way down to preferably a fist sized group in the COM, with as fast of follow up shots as you can manage. The reason I say fist sized is, at close range and for self defense, that's pretty much all the accuracy anyone will need, and it generally seems to be a good balance between speed and accuracy. Going for the one hole groups at 0-15yds means you are likely going to have extremely slow follow up shots.
     
  7. DocRod

    DocRod New Member

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    First off, you now own an excellent pistol; but like anything new, it takes practice to get really proficient with it.

    I shoot 2 different Taurus 24/7's in CQC team competition matches, the .40 S&W and the .45 ACP, and I wouldn't trade for either one of them. When I was discharged from the military in 1972, I went to work for Smith & Wesson as a salesman in the LE division. Over several years of trading and bartering with LE officers and other salesmen, I acquired a ridiculous number of handguns, enough that I could open my own gun store if I had wanted too. I have at least one handgun from over 30 different manufacturers, so I can easily choose whatever I want to compete with, and I use the 24/7 over the others for four simple reasons:

    (1) I have small hands and it fits my hand like a glove
    (2) speed (2007 worlds fastest pistol record holder/NRA Handgun of the Year)
    (3) accuracy, when I do what I'm supposed to do! :rofl:
    (4) overall dependability - without fail, they fire every time I pull the trigger.

    The Heinie sights were designed by Richard Heinie specifically for the Taurus 24/7 pistol. This sight does take a little getting used to, but it's worth the time. For a decent explanation and visual picture of how to use them, go to:

    How do I shoot the Heinie sights?

    Practice, practice, practice! You'll get to where you love those sights because their simplicity makes accuracy a no-brainer.

    You didn't mention which caliber your pistol was, so I'm not sure how to address your jamming issue. I ran into some problems early on with the .40S&W whenever I used a certain brand of ammo because they were not hot enough to cycle the slide properly and that flat nosed round would hit the feedramp lip and jam. So just be aware that ammo issues exist and it isn't always a hardware problem. A quick change in ammo is an easy fix.

    In my personal opinion, the 24/7's don't function really well until they have been thoroughly "broken in", which for me was around 500-700 rounds fired through them. Get some snap-caps or dummy ammo and dry fire your pistol while you are sitting in front of the tube or watching paint dry. It will help speed up the process of wearing the parts in. Once its fully broken in, the 24/7 is an outstanding, worry-free weapon for personal defense, plinking, or zombie killing.

    I hope this helps you a little and I apologize for being so long winded... it's a bad habit I've never been able to break! :banghead:
     
  8. smittysmith13

    smittysmith13 New Member

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    Doc, I really appreciate all the input. The cal. is a 9mm. The jamming issue has been fixed. After I shot a couple of weekends ago I cleaned the gun and mags real well and it hasn't jammed since. I shot it this past weekend and the gun performed much better! By the end of the day, my wife was wollering out the bulls eye @ 5yds. with it. But, as of today I have sold the pistol to a friend of mine.
     
  9. Bansheeman6100

    Bansheeman6100 New Member

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    we have a 9mm version and havent had and problems, +1 for mag issue
     
  10. smittysmith13

    smittysmith13 New Member

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    Oct 31, 2008
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    well as you know...i said that i had sold my 24/7. me and the guy i sold it to went to the range today to shoot it and i am having more issues with this gun. the pistol worked flawleesly for a 100 rds. then all of the sudden, after you would shoot it, the trigger did not want to come back out to a ready fire position. you physically had to move the trigger forward to fire it again. could it be a build up of powder? am i not cleaning and ooiling something in the trigger assembly? any ideas or suggestions??
     

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