TTC

Discussion in 'News Articles' started by carneyman, Mar 18, 2008.

  1. carneyman

    carneyman Active Member

    309
    0
    16
    Feb 23, 2008
    Tyler
    http://www.dailysentinel.com/hp/con...C_Conference.html?cxtype=rss&cxsvc=7&cxcat=10

    Love the last sentence! Now theres a true Texan.

    Now, I'm all for making it easier for people to travel across Texas (its a 10 hour drive back home...), but the money, confiscation of land, linking up with Mexico/Canada...all bad ideas. Maybe they should just spend the money on fixing the existing roads.
     


  2. Texas1911

    Texas1911 TGT Addict

    May 29, 2017
    Austin, TX
    Why don't they just build a rail structure. A train moves just as fast as a car, but you get to relax and ride along rather than actively drive. It would be more environmentally sound since it would replace cars, take up much less space, be less of a noise burden, and overall a better idea.

    When I was in Southern Germany, I took a day trip to Amsterdam. I didn't have to pack up a bunch of crap into the car, or spend 5 hours driving. I arrived happy, and got back on the train happy. The train has no traffic, even stopping at numerous stops along the way (College Station, Etc.) you could arrive there in roughly the same time. Hell even charging $20 to ride to Houston would be dirt cheap considering you burn that much in gas getting out of Austin.

    I'm all for rail.
     
  3. carneyman

    carneyman Active Member

    309
    0
    16
    Feb 23, 2008
    Tyler
    I think the main reason a rail wouldn't work is because the US is so spread out. No matter what, you would still have to at least rent a car to really get where you were going. Plus the trucking industry won out and kinda stalled the building of rail roads way back when...
     
  4. idleprocess

    idleprocess Active Member

    453
    0
    16
    Feb 29, 2008
    DFW.com
    The trucking industry gets a big fat subsidy in the form of the interstate highway system while the rail industry is left to by and large fend for itself. Small wonder that trucks are the vehicle of choice for most long-haul freight while the railroads seem to be limited to cargoes too large/bulky to move by truck, need to be moved in huge volumes, and/or (ironically enough) need to be moved more cheaply by rail.

    Trucks also have an advantage that suits American urban development from the middle of the 20th century on - they're more numerous than trains and can move to points scattered all over the map in our sprawling, increasingly decentralized suburban landscapes.

    It's a shame that the railroads are a shadow of their former selves. Railroads are more energy-efficient than trucking and generally more cost-effective for long-haul freight. I expect that the rail lines will go partially electric (not all that much of a challenge since the electric motors on diesel-electric locomotives provide 100% of the motive power) before fuel prices start to squeeze the trucking industry even further and start to fight their way back into the long-haul freight market.
     
  5. idleprocess

    idleprocess Active Member

    453
    0
    16
    Feb 29, 2008
    DFW.com
    I find it disappointing that the numerous attempts to build trans-Texas high speed rail lines have all ended in dismal failure. If well-executed, high-speed rail between the major Texas cities would be almost as fast as flying, much faster than driving, less expensive, and probably more convenient.
     
  6. Longtooths

    Longtooths Member

    108
    0
    16
    Mar 12, 2008
    Irving, Texas
    Hope of the Wicked by Ted Flynn

    It's a good read on what our government is up to and this behind the scenes move toward a tri-lateral Union with Mexico, Canada the US and the switch to a new currency, the Amero. Some scary stuff to be sure. I use it to drive my investments and it seems to be working so far.
     
  7. SIG_Fiend

    SIG_Fiend Administrator TGT Supporter Admin

    7,262
    15
    38
    Feb 21, 2008
    Austin, TX
    This is one subject where I'm not afraid to sound foil hat-oriented. A major international highway such as the TTC is a major infrastructure that would certainly help towards facilitating a North American Union. People act like it could never happen, though people thought the European Union wouldn't happen which has now become a reality. I don't have a problem with working and participating with other countries such as Mexico and Canada. Though I feel under no circumstances should our country give up it's sovereignty and concede to a treaty, organization, council or what have you that might have the effect of over riding our Constitution. The European Union is a startling look at what may become possible here in North and South America should we all remain ignorant. Our forefathers put in place a system of checks and balances for a good reason. I have a big problem with a small select group of individuals having control over entire continents without restriction or checks and balances as the history of the world has proven this to ALWAYS turn out bad for everyone involved. Where tyrants have previously taken countries over by force, they've now evolved in intelligence and can do so diplomatically with a pen, a constitution, and promises until it's too late and we realize our basic rights have been taken away.

    Just fyi, Cintra, the major player in the Cintra-Zachry consortium of developers, is based out of Madrid (Zachry is a San Antonio based developer). Cintra-Zachry is the group that has signed an agreement with TXDOT to handle the construction of the TTC (or at least a major part of it, I forget the exact details). They will also be handling the collection of tolls generated by the TTC. Hmm, lets think about that for a second. Cintra is considerably larger than Zachry and is a large international developer based outside of this country. And we are going to allow them to take 584,000 privately owned acres in Texas to build a new major highway, and then we are going to let this foreign company collect the tolls on it?! That's practically foreign eminent domain for all intents and purposes. We are going to lend, mortgage, and sell this state/country into foreign ownership if we haven't already and if we aren't careful. Well I need to adjust the antenna on my foil hat now. ;)
     
  8. Longtooths

    Longtooths Member

    108
    0
    16
    Mar 12, 2008
    Irving, Texas
    Texas is already selling existing toll roads to foreign companies. Truly sad what is happing right in front of our faces.
     
  9. zembonez

    zembonez TGT Addict

    4,765
    0
    36
    Feb 22, 2008
    Republic of Texas
    I hate the idea of rail transportation. This ain't Germany... thank goodness. I'll drive my personal vehicle as long as it is humanly possible and I don't care if it hairlips the pope. My freedom to drive anywhere I darn well please is one I don't intend to part with.

    Rail transportation for shipping goods is another subject. As diesel increases in price, trains get busier.

    Toll roads are inevitable in Texas. There is a lot of ground to cover and only so much tax money to cover balooning build and maintenance costs.
     
  10. Texas1911

    Texas1911 TGT Addict

    May 29, 2017
    Austin, TX
    Installing a functional rail system wouldn't remove the ability for you to drive anywhere you want. In fact, it would help to remove plenty of people off the roads.
     

Share This Page