What makes a 1911 a 1911?

Army 1911

TGT Addict
Mar 17, 2008
3,751
113
Dallas Texas or so
After reading another thread where this was sort of discussed I thought I would ask for your definition. I will give mine after a few posts reply to this.
 

zaraster

Member
Mar 19, 2008
167
16
Ennis
A 1911 is a weapon built to the plans and specks of Mr Browning. Where the parts will change out on the guns made to milspeck from 1 company to another.
Altho it was chambered in 38spl I consider 45 the real 1911
 

Porter

Member
Jun 3, 2008
61
16
Houston
The original pistol Browning designed, that he later based the design submitted for Army testing on, was chambered in .38 super (I think). However, the pistol that was submitted for testing, and that was dubbed the M1911 by the military, was chambered in .45 at the Army's request. I've got an article written at the time the testing was being performed floating around here somewhere. I'll dig it out later, and try to scan it tomorrow.
 

Bullseye Shooter

Active Member
Apr 28, 2008
510
16
Texas Panhandle
You can find just about anything on the internet.
From www.m1911.org website:

The Colt Model 1911 was the product of a very capable person, namely John Moses Browning, father of several modern firearms.
The pistol was designed to comply with the requirements of the U.S. Army, which, during its campaign against the Moros in Philippines, had seen its trusty .38 revolver to be incapable of stopping attackers. An Ordnance Board headed by Col. John T. Thomson (inventor of the Thomson sub-machine-gun) and Col. Louis A. La Garde, had reached the conclusion that the army needed a .45" caliber cartridge, to provide adequate stopping power. In the mean time, J. Browning who was working for Colt, had already designed an autoloader pistol, around a cartridge similar to contemporary .38 Super (dimension-wise). When the Army announced its interest in a new handgun, Browning re-engineered this handgun to accommodate a .45" diameter cartridge of his own design (with a 230 gr. FMJ bullet), and submitted the pistol to the Army for evaluation.
In the selection process, which started at 1906 with firearms submitted by Colt, Luger, Savage, Knoble, Bergmann, White-Merrill and Smith & Wesson, Browning's design was selected, together with the Savage design in 1907. However, the U.S. Army pressed for some service tests, which revealed that neither pistol (Colt's or Savage's) had reached the desired perfection. The Ordnance Department instituted a series of further tests and experiments, which eventually resulted in the appointment of a selection committee, in 1911.
Browning was determined to prove the superiority of his handgun, so he went to Hartford to personally supervise the production of the gun. There he met Fred Moore, a young Colt employee with whom he worked in close cooperation trying to make sure that each part that was produced for the test guns was simply the best possible. The guns produced were submitted again for evaluation, to the committee. A torture test was conducted, on March 3rd, 1911. The test consisted of having each gun fire 6000 rounds. One hundred shots would be fired and the pistol would be allowed to cool for 5 minutes. After every 1000 rounds, the pistol would be cleaned and oiled. After firing those 6000 rounds, the pistol would be tested with deformed cartridges, some seated too deeply, some not seated enough, etc. The gun would then be rusted in acid or submerged in sand and mud and some more tests would then be conducted.
Browning's pistols passed the whole test series with flying colors. It was the first firearm to undergo such a test, firing continuously 6000 cartridges, a record broken only in 1917 when Browning's recoil-operated machine gun fired a 40000 rounds test.
The report of the evaluation committee (taken from 'The .45 Automatic, An American Rifleman Reprint', published by the National Rifle Association of America) released on the 20th of March 1911 stated :
"Of the two pistols, the board was of the opinion that the Colt is superior, because it is more reliable, more enduring, more easily disassembled when there are broken parts to be replaced, and more accurate."On March 29th, 1911, the Browning-designed, Colt-produced .45 Automatic pistol, was selected as the official sidearm of the Armed Forces of U.S.A., and named Model 1911.
 

LittleGun

Active Member
Jun 27, 2008
291
16
Spring/Houston
I don't know what makes a 1911 a 1911, but I want one. I went to the range and rented a 9mm 1911. It didn't feel right. When I buy a 1911 it will be a .45.
 

zaraster

Member
Mar 19, 2008
167
16
Ennis
You can find just about anything on the internet.
From www.m1911.org website:

The Colt Model 1911 was the product of a very capable person, namely John Moses Browning, father of several modern firearms.
The pistol was designed to comply with the requirements of the U.S. Army, which, during its campaign against the Moros in Philippines, had seen its trusty .38 revolver to be incapable of stopping attackers. An Ordnance Board headed by Col. John T. Thomson (inventor of the Thomson sub-machine-gun) and Col. Louis A. La Garde, had reached the conclusion that the army needed a .45" caliber cartridge, to provide adequate stopping power. In the mean time, J. Browning who was working for Colt, had already designed an autoloader pistol, around a cartridge similar to contemporary .38 Super (dimension-wise). When the Army announced its interest in a new handgun, Browning re-engineered this handgun to accommodate a .45" diameter cartridge of his own design (with a 230 gr. FMJ bullet), and submitted the pistol to the Army for evaluation.
In the selection process, which started at 1906 with firearms submitted by Colt, Luger, Savage, Knoble, Bergmann, White-Merrill and Smith & Wesson, Browning's design was selected, together with the Savage design in 1907. However, the U.S. Army pressed for some service tests, which revealed that neither pistol (Colt's or Savage's) had reached the desired perfection. The Ordnance Department instituted a series of further tests and experiments, which eventually resulted in the appointment of a selection committee, in 1911.
Browning was determined to prove the superiority of his handgun, so he went to Hartford to personally supervise the production of the gun. There he met Fred Moore, a young Colt employee with whom he worked in close cooperation trying to make sure that each part that was produced for the test guns was simply the best possible. The guns produced were submitted again for evaluation, to the committee. A torture test was conducted, on March 3rd, 1911. The test consisted of having each gun fire 6000 rounds. One hundred shots would be fired and the pistol would be allowed to cool for 5 minutes. After every 1000 rounds, the pistol would be cleaned and oiled. After firing those 6000 rounds, the pistol would be tested with deformed cartridges, some seated too deeply, some not seated enough, etc. The gun would then be rusted in acid or submerged in sand and mud and some more tests would then be conducted.
Browning's pistols passed the whole test series with flying colors. It was the first firearm to undergo such a test, firing continuously 6000 cartridges, a record broken only in 1917 when Browning's recoil-operated machine gun fired a 40000 rounds test.
The report of the evaluation committee (taken from 'The .45 Automatic, An American Rifleman Reprint', published by the National Rifle Association of America) released on the 20th of March 1911 stated :
"Of the two pistols, the board was of the opinion that the Colt is superior, because it is more reliable, more enduring, more easily disassembled when there are broken parts to be replaced, and more accurate."On March 29th, 1911, the Browning-designed, Colt-produced .45 Automatic pistol, was selected as the official sidearm of the Armed Forces of U.S.A., and named Model 1911.
__________________
Navy Vet, Distinguished Pistol Shot #1399



looking it up takes the fun out of it. Like when I screwed up nd said it was chambered in 38spl and it should have been 38acp
 

idleprocess

Active Member
Feb 29, 2008
450
16
DFW.com
Most 1911 aficionados love the trigger as much as anything.

Otherwise, I'm thinking the key factors are .45ACP, single-stack magazine (7rd), single-action linear trigger, hammer-fired, grip safety, manual safety, Browning barrel lock, and the link-tilt barrel mechanism.

Symbolically, it was the American military sidearm for more than sixty years and served well in four major conflicts. The military seems to want the M1911 back in part even if it's somewhat more maintenance-intensive than the M9 if only because it hits much harder.
 

SIG_Fiend

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Feb 21, 2008
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1911a_zt37_uvpz_4di1_0jef.png
 

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