Hurley's Gold

Freaked out at the range

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  • 44Mo

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    Jan 26, 2009
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    Ft.Worth

    Have you ever done anything at the range that after doing it you’re mad at yourself for doing it? Here is what I did that just freaked me out after I had done it.
    Yesterday I was alone at the range. I had a malfunction with a wheel gun. I unloaded it, close the cylinder, turned it butt up to remove the screw from the Houge grips.
    Saw the problem, fixed it, slide the grips on –not screwed down yet, thumb cock the hammer and squeeze – click, 5 times.
    The part that freaked me out was I had turned (subconsciously) to get better light and now the barrel is pointed behind the firing line at a 45 degree angle across the back wall of the range..
    I looked up and that’s when I noticed I have turned almost all the way around to get more light to work by.
    It made me realize that we at times can be so comfortable in our surrounding that we subconsciously do thing that consciously we would never do.
    Target Sports
     

    lonewolf23c

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    Oct 2, 2008
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    Haven't done that yet, however I've caught myself in my house pointing guns towards my living room from my office a few times. Not good. Like you I try to get into better lighting for work and before you know it the gun is pointing in a direction you were not intending it to be pointed.
     

    tomharkness

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    Jan 6, 2009
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    Yes! At home, and alone, I often will pull my CCW just to keep the "muscle memory" up-to-date. This helps me to get the removal from the conceal holster more familiar. The number one thing that I keep in mind is that the trigger finger is always indexed and never on the trigger.

    The other day I had spent the day on the range and had fired off about 150 rounds. Now, I was home alone and watching "Cops" on TV. I drew my CCW and pointed it at the scum-sucking maggot that the cops were chasing on TV... then realized that I had my finger on the trigger.....AHGGGG!!!! I did not squeeze, but it was wrong... and loaded!!!

    I got that muscle memory down a little too well.
     

    44Mo

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    Jan 26, 2009
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    Ft.Worth
    Yes! At home, and alone, I often will pull my CCW just to keep the "muscle memory" up-to-date. This helps me to get the removal from the conceal holster more familiar. The number one thing that I keep in mind is that the trigger finger is always indexed and never on the trigger.

    The other day I had spent the day on the range and had fired off about 150 rounds. Now, I was home alone and watching "Cops" on TV. I drew my CCW and pointed it at the scum-sucking maggot that the cops were chasing on TV... then realized that I had my finger on the trigger.....AHGGGG!!!! I did not squeeze, but it was wrong... and loaded!!!

    I got that muscle memory down a little too well.

    That is one of the reasons I posted a bone head act on my on parts, was to help raise awareness of how we can become complacent when we feel "Too" comfortable in our surroundings while handling a gun.
    It's just human nature and something we have to keep at the top of the awareness list
    Thanks for sharing!
     

    40Arpent

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    Jul 16, 2008
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    Mental note to self: Stay the hell away from Tom Harkness. Seriously dude, a mental lapse such as that described by the OP can be understood, but playing gunfighter with a loaded gun with the bad guys on TV is just way to fricking weird.
     

    glockrocker

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    Dec 11, 2008
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    Austin, TX
    I'm pretty sure he made it obvious what he was doing, practicing, training his brain for a quick draw and assessing the situation. I do it all the time, so if I ever do half to draw and point my weapon of choice, my brain will be trained to make totally sure I want something dead before adrenaline pulls the trigger 15 times for me.
     

    40Arpent

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    I do it all the time...

    I practice at home alone often as well, but I make a conscious decision about it, and prepare accordingly. I am by no means perfect, and have had my share of experiences similar to the OP, but drawing down on a TV with a loaded gun on a whim just seems excessively careless. Just my , money back guaranteed. ;)
     

    WB5MHA

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    Feb 4, 2009
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    What kind of TV did you almost kill?

    Explain that one to the wife. No, don't. Drop it off at Goodwill, buy a new one and pretend nothing happened. Don't forget to mud the hole in the wall behind. It's a dead give away.
     

    Texas1911

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    The other day I had spent the day on the range and had fired off about 150 rounds. Now, I was home alone and watching "Cops" on TV. I drew my CCW and pointed it at the scum-sucking maggot that the cops were chasing on TV... then realized that I had my finger on the trigger.....AHGGGG!!!! I did not squeeze, but it was wrong... and loaded!!!

    I got that muscle memory down a little too well.



    Easy killer. That would have been one hell of a surprise if you yanked the trigger.

    "F&(@! My ears!"
    "Where'd my TV go?"
    "FU@($&!"

    I would love to hear the explanation to the cops.

    "I was sleeping, then I woke up and heard sirens. Then I looked up and saw some guy running with my stereo so I shot him! Then I realized I was watching Cops. Any of you boys selling a TV?"
     

    Texas1911

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    Mental note to self: Stay the hell away from Tom Harkness. Seriously dude, a mental lapse such as that described by the OP can be understood, but playing gunfighter with a loaded gun with the bad guys on TV is just way to fricking weird.

    Everyone does stupid stuff in their life at some point. You just have to learn from it, if you manage to live through it.

    Just don't be around people that are habitual dumbasses though.
     

    WB5MHA

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    Feb 4, 2009
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    Houston
    confession

    In 1969 I returned from Viet Nam. About four days home I was in the hardware store and asked to see one of the scoped hunting rifles on the rack behind the counter. The clerk handed it to me, I looked through the scope at a bus stop about 150 yards away through the plate glass front window. I put the crosshairs of the scope on some citizen waiting for a bus and left my finger on what could have been a hair trigger.

    You can guess the rest.

    Not wanting to dry fire a new rifle I pulled up on the bolt, pulled it back and ejected a live 243 round. The clerk didn't seem to care much and said something like "oops". I was so shaken I couldn't think straight. At the time an innocent person gunned down from inside a store by an obviously "psychotic returned Viet Nam vet" would have made page one. He would have been very dead (I scoped his head) and I would probably have been put in the VA for the rest of my young years.

    If you see old videos you will notice that safety and muzzle control were not a priority in the military in those days. I remember training films that showed weapons being pointed in unsafe directions. Still the experience left me with a case of the terminal heeby-jeebys that lasts to this day and takes presidence over anything that happened during the war. I still don't go to gun shows with the numb-nuts pointing weapons all over. I avoid comercial shooting ranges when they are crowded for the same reason. Practice is ok once your check list of safety measures is completed carefully the way a pilot does his/her pre-flight check list.

    Just thought I would get that off my chest after all these years. If safety is the only thing you learn during weapon instruction consider yourself successful in a big, BIG way.
     

    Texas1911

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    May 29, 2017
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    In 1969 I returned from Viet Nam. About four days home I was in the hardware store and asked to see one of the scoped hunting rifles on the rack behind the counter. The clerk handed it to me, I looked through the scope at a bus stop about 150 yards away through the plate glass front window. I put the crosshairs of the scope on some citizen waiting for a bus and left my finger on what could have been a hair trigger.

    You can guess the rest.

    Not wanting to dry fire a new rifle I pulled up on the bolt, pulled it back and ejected a live 243 round. The clerk didn't seem to care much and said something like "oops". I was so shaken I couldn't think straight. At the time an innocent person gunned down from inside a store by an obviously "psychotic returned Viet Nam vet" would have made page one. He would have been very dead (I scoped his head) and I would probably have been put in the VA for the rest of my young years.

    Pretty wild man. We've had a few people come in with guns, mags in, closed actions and when you ask them to open them up out comes a shiny new one. They always are dumbfounded like some ammo gnome put them in the gun last night.

    Thanks for your service in Vietnam.
     
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