Medical Techniques/Classes specifically about GSWs

Koinonia

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Sep 10, 2012
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We have had a good amount of discussion going on in another thread regarding current, uptodate techniques to treat Gunshot wounds.

I believe this topic deserves its own thread for discussion.

Post up to date information and tips on treating a GSW in a range or hunting setting, and classes we can take to further those skills!
 

benenglish

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You asked about "treating a GSW in a range or hunting setting". That's also what interests me.

However, it seems that most classes in how to treat these wounds invariably include a pistol component, including shooting while treating, moving the victim, etc. I'm a civilian. I'm not in a war zone. I'm most likely to see a GSW on a range or while hunting. If it happens during a self-defense scenario, well, any armed encounter I'm involved in or witness will be over in seconds. The chance of needing to understand all the dynamics of treatment while under fire, for me and (I suspect) the overwhelming majority of non-uniformed students, is vanishingly small.

Does anybody teach classes that are treatment, only, and completely leave out the whole notion that bad guys may be shooting at you at the same time?

I'm looking and interested.
 

txinvestigator

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Lone Star Medics is doing a class as we speak. It is called Range Response. It is a great class. Caleb does not try to make it an anatomy class, either. I took it last year and in 8 hours was better prepared than I was when I was a certified first aid and CPR Instructor.

Lone Star Medics - Lone Star Medics


Everyone who shoots should have a personal First Aid Kit (fak) that includes a tourniquet, pressure bandage, chest seal and some quick clot gauze. Have a medical emergency plan, even if at a public range in the middle of town.
 

codygjohnson

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Everyone who shoots should have a personal First Aid Kit (fak) that includes a tourniquet, pressure bandage, chest seal and some quick clot gauze. Have a medical emergency plan, even if at a public range in the middle of town.
This right here. You should always have enough equipment on you when shooting to slow down blood loss until EMS arrives, and know how to use it. A lot of us shoot in some pretty remote locations. Where I shoot, emergency response would be close to 20 minutes. I shoot alone a lot and fully understand that if I accidentally shoot myself, it's pretty much a death sentence without the training and equipment to stop the bleeding.
 

benenglish

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Thanks, TXI. The recommendation of a satisfied customer means a lot.
 

codygjohnson

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As far as training, TXI gave a great recommendation. If nothing else, read the directions or watch some YouTube. My training came from an Army doc first. A bit later, I realized she didn't really have much experience with GSWs, I hit up another acquaintance, a Navy Corpsman who had some real experience with them. He and I sat down, used and talked about the equipment I carried and I felt a little better about the info I got.

I've bought a couple of IFAKs from Chinook Medical Gear. They are great kits for the money, although there's a few things you need to toss out if you don't have the proper training to use, decompression meddles come to mind... They came with a triage card that's actually pretty good. I keep those cards in my kits that come along to the range with me. If I'm still conscious enough to have someone get my kit, hopefully they can at least read directions if nothing else...lol.
 

F350-6

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Everyone who shoots should have a personal First Aid Kit (fak) that includes a tourniquet, pressure bandage, chest seal and some quick clot gauze. Have a medical emergency plan, even if at a public range in the middle of town.
Old, outdated guy checking in. Please describe the current chest seal. Are we talking about shot to the chest area or are we talking about a sucking chest wound? I'm interested to hear if this has changed and what the recommended treatment steps are. For a sucking chest wound, still roll them on their side after sealing the hole(s)?
 

breakingcontact

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Chest seal? You mean MRE bag?
 
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