Thinking about getting into reloading.

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by bjl95mustang, Jan 25, 2009.

  1. bjl95mustang

    bjl95mustang Member

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    Jan 8, 2009
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    I have been reading up on reloading online and It seems to be pretty cost effictive.

    I figured I would break even after 1000 rounds including equipment.

    I have been looking at a lee pro 1000 press.

    As a starter would you recomend this press? Or would you recomend a different brand? I'm trying to keep the press price around $150.
     


  2. Fisherman777

    Fisherman777 Well-Known

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    I was looking at the next one up. I forgot the name. It's a little over $200. We figured we would be ahead at around 2000 rounds.
     
  3. Tired Retired

    Tired Retired New Member

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    I have reloaded on and off for years and have gone thru several different set-ups to get to where I am at. You will find that it will become a seperate hobby from shooting and it is VERY addictive. IMHO, you may want to look at several other factors in making your decisions about your initial set-up/investment:

    1) First, what volume will you be reloading? Reloading 100 rounds a month can be easily done with little time with a low-end, single stage pressand you will not break even on a lareg investment for some time. If you shoot enough to require 2,000 a month, then you will either have to go to a progressive, multi-stage press or spend alot of time punching them out on a single stage. No matter what press you buy, the cost of your dies will be the same.

    2) Second, what caliber or multiple calibers will you be reloading? For a specific number of rounds, your "savings" will be greater for .45 ACP or .44 Mag than they will be for 9 mm or .223 right now. And for each additional cailber, you have the cost of the dies, shell holder, primer base holder (for hand primers), case trimmer, etc.

    3) Which do you "value" more: your time or the accuracy of each round? Progressive loading is very fast, especially with a high end machine. However, you get the best accuracy with batch reloading, especially if you measure each powder charge with a quality electronic scale. One "costs" you time, the other "saves" you time.

    4) Pay now or pay later? Some people have the opinion that you should invest in the best equipment you can possibly afford up front. Some people think it is better to learn on more affordable, middle-cost equipment and then "trade up" later if you choose to stick with reloading. Thats a personal choice. I will tell you from my personal experience, I started cheap while in college because of economic limitations (hell, I was broke!) and continously upgraded over the years. But that is my point, I am always upgrading when I have a few extra dollars. I doubt that I would have everything I wanted or needed even if I own Lyman's or RCBS.

    Ok, enough lecture and preaching. All this typing has remined me that I got to get some brass out of the tumbler.

    Good luck and enjoy your new hooby! P.S. I can tell you where the local R.A. (Reloaders Anonymous) is meeting if you need it.
     
  4. LS6TT

    LS6TT Member

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    Jan 11, 2009
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    Great post. thank you i am breaking into reloading now and whats the best place to get supplies online?

    I assume the powder cannot be shipped?
     
  5. Bullseye Shooter

    Bullseye Shooter Active Member

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  6. Fisherman777

    Fisherman777 Well-Known

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    Preach on brother! Thanks for advising us on our new "hooby". ;) For now, I want to reload 45 ACP and 12 guage shot shells. In a while, maybe I'll reload 303 British and 450 Weatherby Mag.
     
  7. bjl95mustang

    bjl95mustang Member

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    Austin, Texas
    Thanks for the info guys.

    I want to shoot as much as I can. I know I can get some 1 step loaders pretty cheap. But while looking at prices its the spend a little bit more to get more.

    I have seen the Lee loades and from what I have read they are good for a basic setup. But they have the auto casing loaders, bullet loaders, primer loaders, ect.

    I am looking at thier turrent setup 4 step, That will cost me about $150, or the load master for $250 it's a pregressive and looks pretty good.

    Anyone on here use Lee brand presses? How are they for you?
     
  8. The_Vigilante

    The_Vigilante Member

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    I own a Lee Classic Single Stage press, Lee Classic Turret press, and a Lee Loadmaster Progressive. All are sturdy presses. For your situation I would recommend a Lee Classic Turret Press Kit. It can be used as a single stage or a turret. Kits can be found at Cabela's or Kempf. Good luck.
     
  9. Tired Retired

    Tired Retired New Member

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    I have used Lee presses exclusively over the years. They are durable, well built and relatively lightweight. My main one right now if a Lee Breech Lock Challanger single stage. I also am using a 3-hole Turret Press that I first got in the 80's. Friends I have known over the years have had a mixture of all the brands. Its kinda like the difference between car makers. There are alot of different pickup trucks on the road, and they all haul things. We all just have a preference between Chevy, Ford and Dodge. I have a mix of manufacturers for other equipment (dies, scales, measures, trimmers, tumblers, etc). However, I do make a strong recommendation that you get carbide dies for any straight wall cases you reload.

    I personally will not go with any form of progressive presses. I had a squib load in a revolver about 25 years ago and I have only done batch loading ever since. Yea, it takes alot more time, but I will throw about 25 powder charges and the then visually inspect each case with a bright light to insure that the powder levels are equal. Yes, your eyes will pick up slight variations. It also makes for incredibly accurate lots of ammo.

    The advice I give friends when they start is simple - get a good inexpensive kit with all the basics. While this may require use of several labor intensive equipment pieces (scales, press, etc), you will learn the basics of reloading from the beginning. As your skills and knowledge level increase, you can always get better equipment thru upgrade or "trading up". Starting with an RCBS Pro2000 as a first kit will make some bullets, but will you really understand what you are doing?

    Remember, grasshopper... wax on, wax off....
     
  10. bjl95mustang

    bjl95mustang Member

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    Jan 8, 2009
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