What have you done to your vehicle lately?

Discussion in 'Automotive / Motorcycle Chat' started by TheCytochromeC, Apr 25, 2014.

  1. Brains

    Brains Well-Known

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    Very true, you still have to use the same age-old methods of troubleshooting. Modern cars just give you timely access to a lot of information you used to need a chest of various measurement tools to get. The engine (long blocks) themselves haven't changed significantly, it's the controls which are different. The same valve spring compressor you use on a 1955 Chevy will work on a 2018 ZL1. Honestly, I'd rather do plugs on the '17 - because I'm not going to be doing them for probably 10 years. :) In the case of the little 4 bangers, those are disposable cars. If you get to the point you need to put in a new timing belt, trade it in and let the dealer mess with it lol. In all seriousness, if I did need to do it, modern assembly methods have made it very fast and easy to drop the whole front subassembly out of the car. Shade-trees have accustomed themselves to trying to fit under the hood because that's how we've always done it. I guarantee, once you see how easy it is to lift the car off the subframe, and yes you can do it in your garage, it's an eye opening experience.

    You only pay through the nose if you need to pay someone else to do it. On average, each repair MIGHT be more expensive, but over time you're spending less because you're repairing less. Points, condensers, distributor cap and rotor, etc. don't exist any more. Those maintenance items and their costs are gone. Even the plugs last 100k. Carbs don't exist, eliminating another maintenance item. If you have to change a fuel injector in today's world, something went way wrong. If you do need to change one, they're no more difficult to swap out than a carb and there's no tuning needed afterwards.

    If you have any questions, I know pretty much every nut and bolt in that car.
     


    SidewaysTA likes this.
  2. grasshopperglock

    grasshopperglock Error 404

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    Replacing a decoupler pulley on a Mitsubishi alternator attached to a dodge 2.4. Also changing out an idler pulley.

    The pulley ran $45. The idler was $10. To remove the pulley I had to make a tool, $2.
     
  3. SidewaysTA

    SidewaysTA Active Member Lifetime Member

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    Thanks. I've spoken with you on a couple of occasions on ls1tech. I'll definitely hit you up if needed.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G925A using Tapatalk
     
  4. grasshopperglock

    grasshopperglock Error 404

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    Changed an alternator on a 2011 Corvette Grand Sport. LS3, automatic. He offered money for the repair and bought the rebuilt alt. It's a 20min change out. The generosity was worth more then the money. Now he's back on the road....

    If a white corvette passes you up. I did that.
     
  5. sharkey

    sharkey Member

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    Traded the Regal for a base RWD ATS


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  6. rman

    rman Well-Known

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    not sure if it was what I did to my vehicle, or if it was what "he" did to my vehicle...

    middle-aged guy, with his wife and 2 kids in a 11-16 crew cab long bed F250 6.7 diesel, 100% stock except for the purplish/reddish FLORAL SEAT COVERS, got the jump on me at a light into a merging lane.

    i floored my 2003 6.0 powerstroke, bulletproofed, FICM and PCM tuned, 4" downpipe/5"straight piped, billet compressor wheel blah blah blah.

    i knew all my mods ran like a stock 6.7 but never had to actually test that claim. He got a negligible lead on me, enough to take me in the merge.

    In my defense, I am om 35s with stock gears. I may have gained an inch on him with proper gearing lol.

    Can't wait to get more lift, bigger tires, bigger fuel, bigger sticks, and bigger turbo haha. My goal is high 12s capable on 37s...

    Sent from my SIG Sauer
     
  7. Bozz10mm

    Bozz10mm TGT Addict TGT Supporter

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    It was the floral seat covers.
     
    deemus likes this.
  8. SidewaysTA

    SidewaysTA Active Member Lifetime Member

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    Continued working on the TA today and some Friday.

    Cut out the old catback exhaust. The pile of leftovers.
    [​IMG]

    Removed the rear control arms, shocks and springs. Here's a comparison of the old stuff and the new stuff. I'm installing Spohn LCAs, BMR springs and LCA relocation brackets and Koni shocks.
    [​IMG]

    Here they are installed.
    [​IMG]

    I removed the torque arm and the transmission cross member to install a new cross member which relocates the torque arm mount off the tail shaft of the trans to the cross member. Also installed a poly trans mount.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I'm not installing the torque arm yet because I decided to work on the Carrier/R&P change in the rear end before reinstalling the TA, sway bar and panhard bar. Those parts tend to get in the way when working on the rear end. I'm starting all of that tomorrow.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2017
    ZX9RCAM likes this.
  9. TxStetson

    TxStetson Well-Known

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    That should be a huge improvement over factory. Looks good.
     
  10. deemus

    deemus TGT Addict

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    Replaced the shocks on my Xterra, Monroes with KYB shocks, and man the ride difference is crazy good.

    Also replaced the upper control arm. The frigging bolts were rusted in place and had to be cut out. $15 each, factory only was available.

    Threw in a fuel filter change for good measure. Its not only more comfortable and better ride, but seems to have a bit more pep. That filter was the factory original with 130K miles on it.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2017

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